1

Writing using LaTeX I have known that using vertical line in table is bad typography.

Is there any good/bad typography for slides so that newbie can follow these?

You can provide some well-known documentation on this.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Zarko, user31729, Stefan Pinnow, CarLaTeX, Bobyandbob Feb 4 '18 at 21:47

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    Look at the beameruserguide. It has a chapter on that topic. – TeXnician Feb 4 '18 at 17:03
  • 2
    Have you taken a look at chapter 3 of the user guide of the beamer package? It's an 8-page tutorial on designing slide-based presentations. – Mico Feb 4 '18 at 17:03
  • 3
    main tip I can offer is try reading your slide from the back of the room. If you can't read the text, your audience won't be able to read it either. – David Carlisle Feb 4 '18 at 17:10
  • @DavidCarlisle: If you plan a presentation for a conference, say, in Vancouver, while working, say, in Paris, going to the back of the room is a little bit difficult, I would say, unless there are two similar rooms in Vancouver and Paris ;-) – user31729 Feb 4 '18 at 18:01
  • @ChristianHupfer just use a little imagination: stand 5 metres back and read your laptop screen:-) – David Carlisle Feb 4 '18 at 18:22
2
  • I do distinguish between typography recommendations and general recommendations for presentations (e. g. Don't read from the slides, use images, and so on).
  • I understand typography in this context very narrow (e. g. which font to choose).
  • I recommend and others (e. g. Mico, see here) to use sans serif fonts that are wide and dark.
  • If you use serif fonts than the serifs are sometimes too this too thin for the limited resolution of presentation devices (compared to a print on paper).
  • In addition, I think that sans serif fonts are in general easier too read off screens. As far as I know, most operating systems use sans serif fonts.
  • I made three little examples to make my case :).
  • In addition, I think that a so-called large x-height is also beneficial when it comes to readability. (The same is true when writing on a flip chart.)

\documentclass{beamer}

%% 1. Serif Font
\usefonttheme{serif}

%%% 2. Normal Sans Serif Font
%\usepackage{newtxsf}

%%% 3. Wide and Dark Sans Serif Font
%\usefonttheme{professionalfonts}
%\usepackage{arev}

\begin{document}
% ---
\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Serif Font}
%
\begin{block}{Text Example}
This is a simple text example. This is how text looks like.
\end{block}
%
\begin{equation}
\text{e}^{\text{i}y} = \cos(y) + \text{i} \sin(y)
\end{equation}
%
\end{frame}
% ---

% ---
\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Normal Sans Serif Font}
%
\begin{block}{Text Example}
This is a simple text example. This is how text looks like.
\end{block}
%
\begin{equation}
\text{e}^{\text{i}y} = \cos(y) + \text{i} \sin(y)
\end{equation}
%
\end{frame}
% ---

% ---
\begin{frame}
\frametitle{Wide and Dark Sans Serif Font}
%
\begin{block}{Text Example}
This is a simple text example. This is how text looks like.
\end{block}
%
\begin{equation}
\text{e}^{\text{i}y} = \cos(y) + \text{i} \sin(y)
\end{equation}
%
\end{frame}
% ---
\end{document}

enter image description here


Reaction to the comment

Not well known but maybe a start to get the right search terms for a Google search :).

The old usability guideline for online typography was simple: stick to sans-serif typefaces. Because computer screens were too lousy to render serifs properly, attempting serif type at body-text sizes resulted in blurry letter shapes. [...] In 1996, Microsoft's fabled typography group introduced Verdana as one of the first fonts designed explicitly to improve on-screen text legibility. (Found here.)

  • @Dr.ManualKuehner may be default font is sans serif. – alhelal Feb 4 '18 at 18:00
  • @Dr.ManualKuehner You can provide some well-known documentation on this. – alhelal Feb 4 '18 at 18:01
  • @alhelal I added a quick search result but I do not have more time for the evening to provide a better answer. – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Feb 4 '18 at 18:09
  • Latin Modern is especially thin; it would be more instructive to compare sans serifs to something like Charter, which was designed for low-resolution devices. – Thérèse Feb 4 '18 at 20:28
  • Thanks for the hint. I don't have time to update the answer. Feel free to update it. In addition, I just wanted to transport the general idea. cm and lm are widely used. That's why I chose it. – Dr. Manuel Kuehner Feb 4 '18 at 20:33

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