1

I'd like to know ow can i type this symbol like on image in math mode.

\Vdash with indexes

Thank you a lot.

1

You're interested in declaring a new math operator. For this, there exists \DeclareMathOperator (provided by amsmath):

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\DeclareMathOperator*{\VDash}{\vdash}

\begin{document}

See $\VDash_M^*$, or
\[
  \VDash_M^* abc.
\]

\end{document}

Also see What is the difference of \mathop, \operatorname and \DeclareMathOperator? for other options if you don't want to declare a new term.

  • Thank you, but i need it inside of the text like $(q_0,\Delta \omega \Delta^\omega, 0) \Vdash_M^* abc (q_f, \gamma, n)$ – Oggy Mar 12 '18 at 19:29
  • @Oggy: Sure, use $\displaystyle (q_0,\Delta \omega \Delta^\omega, 0) \Vdash_M^* abc (q_f, \gamma, n)$. Of course, this will affect the line height. – Werner Mar 12 '18 at 19:30
0

You can do this at TeX level:

\def\Vdash{\mathop{\vdash}}

$\Vdash_M^* abc$ and
$$
  \Vdash_M^* abc.
$$

\bye

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