56

It is hard to search for this question since most search engines treat the * symbol somehow special, so sorry if that has been asked before.

So, basically, I just would like to know what the difference is between the following two latex snippets. The only difference is that one uses figure while to other one uses figure*:

\begin{figure*}
    \centering
    \includegraphics[width=0.7\textwidth]{MyFig}
    \caption{\label{fig:myfig}MyFig Caption.}
\end{figure*}

and

\begin{figure}
    \centering
    \includegraphics[width=0.7\textwidth]{MyFig}
    \caption{\label{fig:myfig}MyFig Caption.}
\end{figure}

Thank you!

4
  • 42
    figure* produces a double column figure in a two-column document. Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 10:18
  • 1
    Oh, thanks! Since I have a single-column document, that explains why there was no visual difference... Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 10:20
  • 6
    Also, figure* doesn't support [h] or [b]. Commented Mar 29, 2018 at 15:07
  • 3
    @IanThompson: Do you want to post an answer so this can be marked as answered? Commented Nov 6, 2019 at 7:57

1 Answer 1

33

Since the post has been unanswered for over 2 years, I am posting Ian Thompsons answer, so that this question can be marked as answered.

figure* produces a double column figure in a two-column document.

Also, figure* doesn't support [h] or [b].

3
  • Using stfloats.sty, option [b] is working in figure*
    – MadyYuvi
    Commented May 12, 2021 at 13:29
  • 3
    Ok, so that's why I lose my shit every time I have to place a figure in two columns at the top or bottom of the page. This has been going on for like 10 years.
    – Avio
    Commented Jan 13, 2022 at 12:43
  • See also dblfloatfix to place a figure* at the bottom.
    – Karlo
    Commented May 11, 2023 at 17:27

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