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The realscripts package enables one to use true superscripts and subscripts provided by some fonts like Linux Libertine in regular text. This particularly improves the typesetting of footnotemarks. Is there a way to use these in math mode for squares, cubes etc.? Is it advisable?

Edit: I am using `XeLateX'.

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    I think you'd rather want to find a font family that provides an open type math font. For Linux Libertine there's Libertinus, just to give an example. – Christoph90 Apr 14 '18 at 5:51
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    Please tell us which LaTeX format you employ: pdfLaTeX, XeLaTeX, LuaLaTeX, or something else? The fact that you set the 'fontspec' tag suggests that you might be using either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX -- please confirm. – Mico Apr 14 '18 at 6:50
  • Don't forget there are several smaller sizes used for sub- and superscripts, not sure if would look good to have one of them in a different glyph. And wouldn't you run into spacing problems when you get e.g. `x^{2e}? – remco Apr 14 '18 at 7:09
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    it's fine to use these "true superscripts" for what they're designed for -- footnote markers. but in math, as soon as you get a superscript such as ^{2x} there's likely to be a mismatch, and a full set of letters and symbols will never be implemented as unicode superscripts, since the set is open-ended. – barbara beeton Apr 14 '18 at 16:02
  • @Christoph90 Thanks. I am indeed using Libertinus Math for math mode. However, it does not use true superscripts and subscripts. – latex_guy Apr 16 '18 at 1:17
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it's fine to use these "true superscripts" for what they're designed for -- footnote markers. but in math, as soon as you get a superscript such as ^{2x} there's likely to be a mismatch, and a full set of letters and symbols will never be implemented as unicode superscripts, since the set is open-ended.

also, as pointed out by remco in a comment, different sizes are used for sub- and superscripts when they are multi-level, whereas the "true superscripts" typically come in only one size.

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