4

I have done some extensive review of LaTeX fonts and document classes, searching for the style pictured in the samples below. This style is very popular in translations of science books from well-known publishers:

  1. Издательство "Мир"
  2. Наука
  3. Μеждународная Книга

Some samples of this style:

1) Kujundzic S.M. - Methods and Models for Stability, Controllability and Reliability Analysis of Systems Motion (2004, FizMatLit)

Kujundzic S.M. - Methods and Models for Stability, Controllability and Reliability Analysis of Systems Motion (2004, FizMatLit)

2) Alexeiev - Problems in Classical Electrodynamics (MIR Publishers Moscow, 1977)

 Alexeiev - Problems in Classical Electrodynamics (MIR Publishers Moscow, 1977)

3) Gantmacher - Lectures in Analytical Mechanics (MIR Publishers Moscow, 1975)

Gantmacher - Lectures in Analytical Mechanics (MIR Publishers Moscow, 1975)

Any clue on what this font (or template) is called, what's the history behind it and which LaTeX font or document class best resembles it would be extremely appreciated.

2

The first one is a mixture of the “Literaturnaya” fonts for text and Computer Modern for math:

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}
\usepackage{literat}

\DeclareSymbolFont{operators}{OT1}{\familydefault}{m}{n}

\addtolength{\textwidth}{-2.2cm} % to emulate the original

\begin{document}

Here $v^+$ is the pseudoinverse matrix for the column matrix $v$.
From verification of Moore-Penrose conditions it can be readily
seen that
\[
v^+=\frac{1}{\delta}v^{\mathrm{T}}
\]
where the number $\delta=u_1^2+u_2^2+\ldots+u_n^2$.

Here, $v^{\mathrm{T}}=(v_1v_2\ldots v_n)$ -- the row composed
of the elements of column~$v$. Consequently, the estimate
$\widehat{b}$ by the LSM for coefficient~$b$ is found as
\[
\widehat{b}=\frac{u_1v_1+u_2v_2+\ldots+u_nv_n}{\delta}=r'\chi,
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

(I fixed a couple of typos.)

Here's a reproduction of the page header

enter image description here

The Literaturnaya fonts can be installed with getnonfreefonts (see http://tug.org/fonts/getnonfreefonts)

I don't think the other two can be reproduced with available fonts. Frankly, I consider the third example (and in general all old MIR books) very poorly typeset.

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  • That is a precise answer. For those using Windows: 1) If their distribution is MikTex, they may install "Literaturnaya" fonts using the procedure at: blog.harrix.org/article/444 2) If their distribution is LiveTex, they may install "Literaturnaya" fonts using the procedure at: tune-it.ru/web/korg/home/-/blogs/… These sources are in Russian. If the reader doesn't speak russian, just load the page under Google Translate. – Jesse Brewer Apr 20 '18 at 14:11

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