2

I am using biblatex for my bibliography, and the style is alphabetic. More precisely, in the preamble I have

\usepackage[babel]{csquotes}
\usepackage[maxnames=99,style=alphabetic,backend=bibtex]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{bibliography.bib}

In the bibliography I need to include a two word surname. This is what I have in the .bib file

@article{dJ97,
author = {de Jong, A. J.},
title = {Families of curves and alterations},
journaltitle = {Annales de l'institut Fourier},
year = {1997},
volume = {47},
number = {2},
pages = {599-621},
}

In this way, the abbreviation produced is [Jon97], and is alphabetized as a surname starting with J. On the other hand, I have always seen this author alphabetized under d (which I guess should be the correct outcome), and the abbreviation including the "d" of "de". After a quick look online, I just found co-authored works of the author cited in a bibliography style as I have, and the abbreviation is "dJ" followed by other capital letters for the other authors. So, in my case, I guess that the right outcome should be something like [dJo97], or [dJon97].

Which one should the right outcome in my case? How do I get it?

2

The use of shorthand, as suggested by Myles, is indeed a good alternative for individual cases. But, if something more automatic is needed, biblatex has an option useprefix controlling the use of name prefixes, and which is, by default, set to false. You can use useprefix=true as a package option to biblatex and prefixes will be used throughout the document. In your case, it will be considered in the construction of labelalpha.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[babel]{csquotes}
\usepackage[maxnames=99,style=alphabetic,backend=bibtex,useprefix=true]{biblatex}
\usepackage{filecontents}

\begin{filecontents}{bibliography.bib}
@article{dJ97,
author = {de Jong, A. J.},
title = {Families of curves and alterations},
journaltitle = {Annales de l'institut Fourier},
year = {1997},
volume = {47},
number = {2},
pages = {599-621},
}
\end{filecontents}

\addbibresource{bibliography.bib}

\begin{document}

Some text \cite{dJ97}.

\printbibliography

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 1
    +1 This is the biblatexy way of doing this. Unfortunately, I can't upvote this answer twice so it comes out above the other answer. – moewe Apr 20 '18 at 4:49
2

There is a field you can add to your .bib entry called shorthand which allows you to enter a specific citation abbreviation. I can't advise which style, [dJo97] vs [dJon97], is the 'correct' one. This depends on what the citation style guide you are following recommends. But say you wanted to use [dJon97], you would add the following to your .bib entry:

shorthand = {dJon97},

Here is a minimal working example based on what you provided:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[babel]{csquotes}
\usepackage[maxnames=99,style=alphabetic,backend=bibtex]{biblatex}
\usepackage{filecontents}

\begin{filecontents}{bibliography.bib}
@article{dJ97,
author = {de Jong, A. J.},
shorthand = {dJon97},
title = {Families of curves and alterations},
journaltitle = {Annales de l'institut Fourier},
year = {1997},
volume = {47},
number = {2},
pages = {599-621},
}
\end{filecontents}

\addbibresource{bibliography.bib}

\begin{document}

Some text\cite{dJ97}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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