3

I am currently preparing a paper, which makes heavy use of Cyrillic fonts in footnotes. Now I encountered two problems: First, the actual font doesn't make use of Italics, although – as Microsoft Office clearly shows – Italic Cyrillic scripts are available; second, I use csquotes with French Guillemets/Chevrons and it is impossible for me to include them in an easy way – more specifically single Guillemets/Chevrons (e. g. ‹/›). Is there a way to solve either one or both these problems?

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{scrreprt}

\usepackage{ucs}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T2A,T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[french,USenglish,UKenglish,bulgarian,ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage{relsize}
\usepackage[babel,style=swiss,maxlevel=3,threshold=3]{csquotes}
\newenvironment*{smallquote}
{\quote\singlespacing\smaller}
{\endquote}
\SetBlockEnvironment{smallquote}

\begin{document}
Hello.\footnote
{
\enquote{\begin{otherlanguage*}{bulgarian}\enquote*{\textit{Здрасти}.}\end{otherlanguage*}
}
\end{document}
  • 1
    It seems as though lmodern does not have an italic shape for T2A/Cyrillic. If I don't load lmodern the Italics work for me. It also seems to me that T2A has no single guillemet glyph. But hopefully someone who knows more about this stuff comes along and can explain this in more detail and offer proper solutions. – moewe May 12 '18 at 14:25
  • 2
    tex.stackexchange.com/q/171621/35864 could at least help with the single guillemets. Relevant for your italics issue is tex.stackexchange.com/q/333410/35864. It seems to suggest lmodern doesn't really do Cyrillic. – moewe May 12 '18 at 14:29
  • 2
    mirrors.ctan.org/macros/latex/contrib/substitutefont/… may also interest you, apparently substitutefont lets you use lmodern for T1 and a Cyrillic font with T2A. See also tex.stackexchange.com/q/114587/35864 – moewe May 12 '18 at 14:35
  • If you have long stretches of non-Latin text you could also look into the Unicode engines LuaLaTeX and XeLaTeX. Those engines can use system fonts (i.e. the fonts you see displayed in MS Word, pdfLaTeX can normally not access these). – moewe May 12 '18 at 16:25
4

Regarding the italic the easiest is as already suggested in the comments not to use lmodern. Regarding the single guillemet: it doesn't exist in T2A but you can use the T1 version instead. I would also avoid ucs/utfx. In a current latex you actually don't need to load inputenc at all. utf8 is the default anyway.

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{scrreprt}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T2A,T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[french,USenglish,UKenglish,bulgarian,ngerman]{babel}
%\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage{relsize}
\usepackage[babel,style=swiss,maxlevel=3,threshold=3]{csquotes}
\newenvironment*{smallquote}
{\quote\singlespacing\smaller}
{\endquote}
\SetBlockEnvironment{smallquote}
\usepackage{fonttable}
\DeclareTextSymbolDefault\guilsinglright{T1}
\DeclareTextSymbolDefault\guilsinglleft{T1}

\begin{document}
\enquote{\enquote*{\textit{Hallo}.}}
\selectlanguage{bulgarian}
\enquote{\enquote*{\textit{Здрасти}.}}
\end{document}
3

Latin Modern does not support Cyrillic, but you can use Computer Modern Cyrillic instead. Or you have a vast choice of font families, see What fonts are compatible with T2A (Cyrillic) encoding?

Here are a couple of examples, with also some suggestions to simplify your input with \babeltags.

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{scrreprt}

\usepackage[T2A,T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[french,USenglish,UKenglish,bulgarian,ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{relsize}
\usepackage[babel,style=swiss,maxlevel=3,threshold=3]{csquotes}

% the following packages provide fonts supporting Cyrillic
%\usepackage{paratype}
%\usepackage{tempora}
% otherwise
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage{substitutefont}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmr}{cmr}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmss}{cmss}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmtt}{cmtt}

\babeltags{bg=bulgarian}

\DeclareTextSymbolDefault\guilsinglright{T1}
\DeclareTextSymbolDefault\guilsinglleft{T1}

\begin{document}

\section{Latin+Computer Modern}

\enquote{Hello.} \enquote{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}\\
\enquote*{Hello.} \enquote*{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}

\section{ParaType}
\fontfamily{PTSerif-TLF}\selectfont
% to emulate \usepackage{paratype}

\enquote{Hello.} \enquote{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}\\
\enquote*{Hello.} \enquote*{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}

\section{Tempora}
\fontfamily{Tempora-TLF}\selectfont
% to emulate \usepackage{tempora}

\enquote{Hello.} \enquote{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}\\
\enquote*{Hello.} \enquote*{\textbg{\textit{Здрасти}.}}

\end{document}

enter image description here

0

You use Latin Modern which does not include Cyrillic fonts.

If you need Latin Modern for T1 encoding and italic Cyrillic text at the same time, you can find an excellent example of Cyrillic font substitution in the substitutefont documentation.

Also, consider the usage of \guilsinglleft{}, \guilsinglright{}, \guillemotleft{} and \guillemotright{} for quotes.

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{scrreprt}
\usepackage{ucs}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T2A,T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[french,USenglish,UKenglish,bulgarian,ngerman]{babel}
% Combine "Latin Modern" fonts for Latin and
% "CLG" fonts for Cyrillic.
\usepackage{substitutefont}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmr}{fcm}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmss}{fcs}
\substitutefont{T2A}{lmtt}{fct}
\DeclareTextSymbolDefault{\guilsinglright}{T1}
\DeclareTextSymbolDefault{\guilsinglleft}{T1}
\begin{document}
Hello.\footnote
{
\begin{otherlanguage*}{bulgarian}{
      \textit{
        \guilsinglleft{}\guillemotleft{}Здрасти\guillemotright{}\guilsinglright{}}.}
\end{otherlanguage*}
}
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 1
    I'd say csquotes' \enquote as used in the question is far superior to manually typing \guilsinglleft and friends. Is there any reason why you specifically advocate the manual approach? – moewe May 12 '18 at 21:32

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