4

I want the option of adding some Hebrew (including a different font) to my chapter heading but otherwise keep the default chapter style used in scrbook. Most chapter headings will contain only English, but occasionally I would like to have both English AND Hebrew in the chapter heading. I have commented out things I tried that didn't work.

Though \usepackage{libertine} allows the Hebrew to appear, I do not want to use it because that will change everything to a libertine font, and I want to retain the default chapter heading font in English.

MWE:

%XeLaTeX
\documentclass[11pt]{scrbook}

\usepackage{polyglossia}
    \setdefaultlanguage{english}
    \setotherlanguage{hebrew}
    \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{Linux Libertine O}
    \newfontfamily\englishfont{Linux Libertine O}

\begin{document}

\chapter{Hebrew-1 (עברית)}
%\chapter{Hebrew-2 (\texthebrew{עברית})}
%\chapter{Hebrew-3 (\begin{hebrew}עברית\end{hebrew})}
%\chapter{Hebrew-4\selectlanguage{hebrew}(עברית)}

\end{document}

enter image description here

In case you were wondering, עברית is just the Hebrew word for "Hebrew".

6

Chapter titles are typeset in sans serif in scrbook. So you need to define also a sans serif hebrewfont:

\documentclass[11pt]{scrbook}
%\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
    \setdefaultlanguage{english}
    \setotherlanguage{hebrew}
    \newfontfamily\hebrewfont[Script=Hebrew]{Linux Libertine O}
    \newfontfamily{\hebrewfontsf}[Script=Hebrew]{Linux Libertine O}%or whatever
    \newfontfamily\englishfont{Linux Libertine O}

\begin{document}

\chapter{Hebrew-1 \texthebrew{(עברית)}}
%\chapter{Hebrew-2 (\texthebrew{עברית})}
%\chapter{Hebrew-3 (\begin{hebrew}עברית\end{hebrew})}
%\chapter{Hebrew-4\selectlanguage{hebrew}(עברית)}

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • I want the Hebrew in the chapter heading to be a serif font. How would I set the Hebrew to be serif in the chapter while leaving the English as sans serif? – AML May 23 '18 at 18:14
  • ? I don't understand, this is libertine and it is a serif font. – Ulrike Fischer May 23 '18 at 18:17
  • Good point. I was simply confused by the combination of \hebrewfontsf (sans serif) with Linux Libertine O (serif), but now I understand. – AML May 23 '18 at 18:20

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