2
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{pxfonts}

\begin{document}
    `'
\end{document}

gives improper quotation marks, as opposed to

\documentclass{article}
%\usepackage{pxfonts}

\begin{document}
    `'
\end{document}

How may I have proper quotation marks while keep using pxfonts?

  • 1
    The quotation marks of Palatino are simply different. – egreg Jun 10 '18 at 16:06
  • So may I avoid the font Palatino to get standard quotation marks, or find some other way around this? – Frode Bjørdal Jun 10 '18 at 16:11
  • Aha! Switching to txfonts resolved the problem. – Frode Bjørdal Jun 10 '18 at 16:16
4

The shape of the quotation marks is subject to the will of the font designer, like all other glyphs, so long as the shapes are distinctive and carry out their standard meaning.

In the case of Palatino, which PXfonts is based on, designed by Hermann Zapf in 1949, some shapes are quite peculiar; for instance, the “f” does not extend past its bounding box, like in the majority of fonts.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{newpxtext,newpxmath}

\begin{document}

`single quotes'

``double quotes''

\end{document}

I used newPX fonts, which are actively maintained, whereas PXfonts aren't and have several weaknesses.

enter image description here

If you look at the quotes in context, you'll see that they do their job. They're just different from the quotes in Times.

There is no “standard” shape for any glyph, apart from general templates which the font designer develops on. You can like or dislike them, but a font design is “global” and Zapf decided for that shape of the quotes after looking at the whole font. He wanted a “new” design, so it can happen that an eye accustomed to “classical” fonts deems that shape “wrong”. It isn't.

The same test as above, but with quotes taken from Times, would output

enter image description here

You can clearly see that such glyphs don't fit with the global design, that has no bowls at all.

  • So what font is txfonts based upon? – Frode Bjørdal Jun 11 '18 at 1:32
  • 1
    @FrodeBjørdal It is based on Times. The maintained version is newTX (just change p into t). – egreg Jun 11 '18 at 8:14
  • Thanks! Is txfonts unmaintained and newTXfonts maintained? – Frode Bjørdal Jun 13 '18 at 15:59
  • @FrodeBjørdal Yes, txfonts and pxfonts are unmaintained. The maintainer of newtx and newpx is to the contrary very active. – egreg Jun 13 '18 at 16:00
  • I see. I do not find newtx or newpx in the The Comprehensive LATEX Symbol List. – Frode Bjørdal Jun 13 '18 at 21:19

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