3
\begin{figure}
  \begin{subfigure}{.3\textwidth}
    \includegraphics[width=2\linewidth]{images/Baxter.pdf}
    \caption{External Camera Setup}
    \label{fig:baxter}
  \end{subfigure}
  \begin{subfigure}{.3\textwidth}
  \vspace{2cm}
  \centering
  \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{images/FV.png}
  \includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{images/FV_depth.png}
  \caption{Front Camera}
  \label{fig:ub1}
\end{subfigure}
\end{figure}

The above snippet is what I have written. The image Baxter.pdf is on the left and the other images(Fv.png and FV_depth.png) on the right are small but do not get positioned correctly. They overlie on the Baxter.pdf which is an image in itself.

I would like something like this Left is a big image, and right side is multiplle smaller images

  • 1
    Welcome to TeX.SX. There are tons of possibilities, you could put them in a tabular/array, work with TikZ etc. Hard to be more specific because you do not disclose the document class you are using. – user121799 Jun 11 '18 at 2:21
  • @marmot I am sorry, I am sort of new to Latex. I am using \documentclass{article} Is there anything I could refer to to make it tablular – DeepLearning Jun 11 '18 at 2:25
  • 1
    I think that 2 in \includegraphics[width=2\linewidth]{images/Baxter.pdf} is the culprit. It makes the figure overshoot. Use \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{images/Baxter.pdf} instead. – user121799 Jun 11 '18 at 4:07
1

You can just typeset the well-resized small figures one-by-one, line-by-line.

Source

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{subcaption}
\usepackage{mwe}

\newcommand{\fig}{%
    \includegraphics[width=0.25\linewidth]{example-image}%
}

\begin{document}

\begin{figure}
    \centering
    \begin{subfigure}{.45\textwidth}
        \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{example-image}
        \caption{A Big Figures}
        \label{fig:baxter}
    \end{subfigure}
    \begin{subfigure}{.45\textwidth}
        \centering
        \fig \fig \fig \\[-\lineskip]
        \fig \fig \fig \\[-\lineskip]
        \fig \fig \fig \\[-\lineskip]
        \fig \fig \fig 
        \caption{Several Small Figures}
        \label{fig:ub1}
    \end{subfigure}
\end{figure}

\end{document}

Output

output

Notes:

  1. The above example use dummy image example-image from package mwe.

  2. Specific widths of subfigures and figures is designed to let the height of big fig equals to 4 times of the height of small fig.

  3. To manage vertical white space between lines of figures, you can add vertical space using \\[<dimen>]. In the example, -\lineskip is inserted to kill vertical spaces just right.

  4. Take care of the space and/or newline symbols between figure-inserting commands.

% newline symbol acts as a space symbol, therefore produces space
\includegraphics{example-image}
\includegraphics{example-image}

% percent symbol comments out the newline symbol
\includegraphics{example-image}%
\includegraphics{example-image}
0

Something like this?

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[demo]{graphicx} % remove 'demo' option in real document
\usepackage{subcaption}
\begin{document}
\begin{figure}
  \begin{subfigure}{.6\textwidth}
    \includegraphics[width=1\linewidth]{images/Baxter.pdf}
    \caption{External Camera Setup}
    \label{fig:baxter}
  \end{subfigure}%
  \hspace{\fill}
  \begin{subfigure}{.33\textwidth}
    \includegraphics[width=0.45\linewidth]{images/FV.png}%
    \hspace{\fill}
    \includegraphics[width=0.45\linewidth]{images/FV_depth.png}
    \caption{Front Camera}
    \label{fig:ub1}
  \end{subfigure}
  \caption{Overall figure caption}
  \label{fig:overall}
\end{figure}
\end{document}

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