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This is my whole tex file:

\documentclass[12pt]{book}
\usepackage{amsmath,polynom,amssymb,venndiagram,mathtools}

\begin{document}
\pagestyle{empty}
\title{Diophantine Equations}
\author{Sew Qian Hong}
\date{13 June 2018}
\maketitle

\tableofcontents




\chapter{Factorization}
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.



\chapter{Linear Diophantine Equations}

Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
Diophantine equations are polynomial equations with integral coefficients for which integral solutions are required.
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  • 4
    Hi, welcome. Consider adding \end{document}. And perhaps have a look at the geometry package.... or just add \usepackage[margin=3cm]{geometry}, say. And as for "why" this happens: books, i.e. these curious things people were using in the previous Millenium, typically distinguish between even and odd sides, that is there is an inner edge and an outer edge ...
    – user121799
    Jun 13, 2018 at 4:10
  • 4
    I think this could be useful to you: it.sharelatex.com/learn/Single_sided_and_double_sided_documents
    – CarLaTeX
    Jun 13, 2018 at 4:38
  • For examples of page layouts you might care to look at A Few Notes on Book Design (> texdoc memdesign). Jun 13, 2018 at 18:18
  • In order to align my pages I simply used oneside in the document class: \documentclass[oneside]{abntex2} Jan 15 at 17:50
  • 1
    @DanielTerraGomes: This is covered in the current answer; hence my removal of your (duplicate) answer and changing it into a comment.
    – Werner
    Jan 15 at 18:00

1 Answer 1

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The article and report LaTeX document classes, by default, use the oneside page layout option. One of the characteristics of this option is that the left-hand and right-hand margins are equal by default.

In contrast, the book LaTeX document class uses the twoside option. One of its characteristics is that if the document were printed and bound as a physical book, the "inner" margins -- those closer to the book's spine -- end up being narrower than the outer margins. I was once told that this is because when people hold a book open in their hands, they typically use their thumbs to do so. So as not to have the thumbs obscure the written text, the outer margins -- where the thumbs typically are placed -- are usually made a bit wider. I have no idea if that's the real reason, though.

If you need to use the book document class but don't like the twoside layout option, specify oneside explicitly:

\documentclass[12pt,oneside]{book}

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