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Does anyone have a .bst file of the Journal of Finance citation standard in GERMAN?

I tried to change the original English language version into one that uses German keywords. It works somehow but it still has some issues. For instance, there is a comma before the "und" conjunction, and that's not right for a German-language document. I am not quite sure if the Standard is correct itself. Can somebody please help me? Maybe it's an old code?

My file jfgerman.bst differs from the file `jf.bst, which is available online at http://faculty.haas.berkeley.edu/stanton/texintro/jf/jf.bst, in the passage that defines language-specific variable names. E.g., instead of

 % Here are the language-specific definitions for explicit words.
 % Each function has a name bbl.xxx where xxx is the English word.
 % The language selected here is ENGLISH

FUNCTION {bbl.and}
{ "and"}

my file jfgerman.bst features

FUNCTION {bbl.and}
{ "und"}
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Why do you have to use exactly this style (even translated)? – TeXnician Jun 18 '18 at 20:16
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    Is this a near-duplicate of your earlier posting, Journal of Finance Template German '*.bst'? You should take a moment to explain in detail what exactly it is that doesn't work about the answer you got to that query. E.g., is it mainly the "Oxford comma", or is it something else? – Mico Jun 18 '18 at 20:37
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    Crosspost to golatex.de/zitieren-in-lyx-t20795.html – moewe Jun 19 '18 at 13:57
  • Yes I know. I thought maybe somebody would see it that knows the answer. The comma is a problem and if I wanna make a citation from a website everything shows up in the reference (name, title, date) except the URL and I need that. – HELPGERMAN Jun 19 '18 at 14:52
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    @HELPGERMAN - Please see the answer I just posted for a simple method for removing all Oxford commas. Note that the style file is very old -- old enough, in fact, for it not to be programmed to do anything with a field named url. This means that if you really have to use this style file and you wish to show a URL in the formatted bibliographic entry, you have to (a) be sure to load the url package separately and (b) to place the URL information in the field called note. E.g., note = "\url{my/long/and/happy/and/complicated/URL/string}",. – Mico Jun 20 '18 at 17:53
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In this answer, I will address the following issue raised by the OP: How to modify a specific bibliography style file so that it no longer inserts an "Oxford comma"?

I suggest you proceed as follows:

  • Open the file jfgerman.bst.

  • In this file, locate the function called format.names. In this function, locate the following line:

                  "," *
    

    (It comes immediately before a line that says t "others" =.)

    Comment out (or delete) this line.

  • Next, locate the function format.names.ed -- it's located right after the format.names function -- and again delete the instruction "," *.

  • Finally, locate the function named format.full.names and find the following 4-line block in that function:

                   numnames #2 >
                     { "," * }
                     'skip$
                   if$
    

    Delete (or comment out) the entire block.

  • Save the file jfgerman.bst, and re-run LaTeX, BibTeX and LaTeX twice more on your main tex file to propagate the changes.

Happy BibTeXing!

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    In my golatex answer (golatex.de/zitieren-in-lyx-t20795.html) I also removed the comma in format.names.ed and format.full.names. – moewe Jun 20 '18 at 18:20
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    @helpgerman You see, all helpers are united and work together. Crossposts should be marked. Crossposts are a way to get an answer faster, but linking is also a way to avoid extra work. – Johannes_B Jun 20 '18 at 18:25
  • @moewe - Thanks for this comment. It hadn't occurred to me to consider the case of entries with editor instead of author field. Tsk, tsk. I've updated (corrected!) my answer. – Mico Jun 20 '18 at 18:34

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