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I want to use a \href to link to a specific page in a local PDF file. This works fine, as long as I don't put that \href in a \footnote. Linking to just the PDF file without linking to a specific page also works fine, even in the footnote.


However, once I try to combine the two, or even add a # to the end of the PDF-link, I get the following error message:

! Illegal parameter number in definition of \Hy@tempa.<to be read again>p ...18/Theo/Skript.pdf#page=123}{Herleitung}}

The full line that yields the error looks like this

\footnote{\href{run:C:/Users/Lars/Desktop/Uni/SoSe 18/Theo/Skript.pdf#page=123}{Herleitung}}.

and is within text environment. As far as I understand, \footnote somehow breaks once you use a # somewhere within its arguments, although I'm not sure why.

I would greatly appreciate if anyone has a solution to linking to a specific page in a PDF file within a footnote.


For reference, my desired output looks like this:

This is some text1.

This is more text.

This is the bottom of the page.

===========

1 Herleitung(this word is the link to the pdf file)

1 Answer 1

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\href has to change category codes. But this does not work inside the argument of other commands (here: \footnote).

Fix: Instead of #, macro \# can be used:

\footnote{\href{http:www.example.org/foobar.pdf#page=123}{Herleitung}}

A simple GoToR link should be used for local PDF files. The page is specified by the optional argument, e.g.:

\href[page=2]{foobar.pdf}{Herleitung}
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  • This runs, but breaks the link. I also tried using {\#} instead of \#, but the problem persists.
    – L. Kue
    Jul 15, 2018 at 21:04
  • The new suggestion of adding the optional argument now (naturally) restores the link, but the [page=123] has no effect, meaning simply the first page of the pdf is linked.
    – L. Kue
    Jul 15, 2018 at 21:38
  • @L.Kue Try a different PDF viewer. Jul 16, 2018 at 0:11

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