1
\documentclass[12pt]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{amsthm}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{float}
\usepackage{framed}
\usepackage[hang,flushmargin]{footmisc}

\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
\newtheorem{corollary}{Corollary}[theorem]
\newtheorem{lemma}[theorem]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{definition}{Definition}[section]

\begin{document}
\noindent \newline A \textbf{Hamiltonian path} is a directed path that goes through every node exactly once. Consider the problem of testing whether a directed graph contains a Hamiltonian path that connects two specified nodes. Let: 
\begin{multline}
\nonumber HAMPATH = \{\langle G, s, t \rangle| G \text{ is a directed graph with a Hamiltonian path from } s \text{ to } t.\}
\end{multline}

\end{document}

I have the above LaTeX code, and I have looked up, on both TeX SE and Google, how to split equations. I have tried to use multline as well as split to try and cut the equation so that it fits between the margins. Nothing I have tried so far has worked, so I am at a loss as to what to do.

The final result I am after is the following image, but such that the whole thing sans the things in the \text{} environment is formatted as an equation, rather than in plain text:

enter image description here

  • 1
    \noindent \newline don't do that:( but you can have multiple lines in a multline by using \\ (and delete the spurious \end{equation} that has no \begin – David Carlisle Aug 1 '18 at 18:43
2

Perhaps

enter image description here

   \documentclass[12pt]{report}
    \usepackage{amsmath}
    \usepackage{amssymb}
    \usepackage{amsthm}
    \usepackage{tikz}
    \usepackage{graphicx}
    \usepackage{float}
    \usepackage{framed}
    \usepackage[hang,flushmargin]{footmisc}

    \newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
    \newtheorem{corollary}{Corollary}[theorem]
    \newtheorem{lemma}[theorem]{Lemma}
    \newtheorem{definition}{Definition}[section]

    \begin{document}

    A \textbf{Hamiltonian path} is a directed path that goes through
    every node exactly once. Consider the problem of testing whether a
    directed graph contains a Hamiltonian path that connects two
    specified nodes. Let:
    \begin{align*}
    \nonumber \mathit{HAMPATH} &= \{\langle G, s, t \rangle\\
&\quad{} \mid  G \text{ is a directed graph with a Hamiltonian path from }\\
&\qquad s \text{ to } t.\}
    \end{align*}

    \end{document}

Or judging by comments perhaps you want an inline setting

enter image description here

\documentclass[12pt]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{amsthm}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{float}
\usepackage{framed}
\usepackage[hang,flushmargin]{footmisc}

\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
\newtheorem{corollary}{Corollary}[theorem]
\newtheorem{lemma}[theorem]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{definition}{Definition}[section]

\begin{document}

A \textbf{Hamiltonian path} is a directed path that goes through
every node exactly once. Consider the problem of testing whether a
directed graph contains a Hamiltonian path that connects two
specified nodes. Let:
$\mathit{HAMPATH} = \{\langle G, s, t \rangle
\mid  G $ is a directed graph with a Hamiltonian path from 
 $s$ to $t$.$\}$


\end{document}
  • How can I do this, but make the split within the \text{} environment? I tried to move the & and the \\ but it just threw a ton of errors. – user83024 Aug 1 '18 at 19:07
  • @user83024 just close the \text do the \\ then have another \text on the next line. – David Carlisle Aug 1 '18 at 19:08
  • Is it possible to align the bottom line to the left side of the equation? I have it working, but the bottom line is right-aligned. I've tried flushleft but it hasn't worked. – user83024 Aug 1 '18 at 20:42
  • @user83024 you want it to go to the left of the = ?? – David Carlisle Aug 1 '18 at 20:43
  • I want to put it all on the left side of the equation space. – user83024 Aug 1 '18 at 20:44
1

There are many possibilities, one is to work with align and \MoveEqLeft that comes with mathtools.

\documentclass[12pt]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
\newtheorem{corollary}{Corollary}[theorem]
\newtheorem{lemma}[theorem]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{definition}{Definition}[section]

\begin{document}
A \textbf{Hamiltonian path} is a directed path that goes through every node exactly once. Consider the problem of testing whether a directed graph contains a Hamiltonian path that connects two specified nodes. Let: 
\begin{align}
 \text{HAMPATH} &= \\
 \MoveEqLeft[4] \{\langle G, s, t \rangle| G \text{ is a directed graph with a Hamiltonian path from } s 
 \text{ to } t.\}\notag
\end{align}
\end{document}

enter image description here

1

You can get a similar effect to multline with a minipage:

\documentclass[12pt]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
A \emph{Hamiltonian path} is a directed path that goes through
every node exactly once. Consider the problem of testing whether
a directed graph contains a Hamiltonian path that connects
two specified nodes. Let
\[
\begin{minipage}{0.8\displaywidth}
  \leftskip=0pt plus 1fil
  \rightskip=0pt plus 1fill
  \parfillskip=0pt plus -1fill
  $\mathrm{HAMPATH} = \{\langle G, s, t \rangle\mid G$
  is a directed graph with \\ a Hamiltonian path from $s$ to $t\}$.
\end{minipage}
\]

\end{document}

The settings to \leftskip, \rightskip and \parfillskip ensure left alignment (in the allotted space) in the top line and right alignment in the bottom line.

enter image description here

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