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Wondering about how LaTeX implements the vertical and horizontal brackets [{(⟨.

I saw these unicode characters which could potentially be used for vertical brackets:

⎡
⎢
⎣
⎤
⎥
⎦
⎧
⎨
⎩
⎪
⎫
⎬
⎭

But they would have to manually fine-tune the position of them because they don't line up:





In addition, unicode only has this partial support for vertical brackets only, it doesn't have it for horizontal brackets. Maybe you could rotate them though...

Wondering if they are instead drawing them by hand somehow, or where the implementation is so I can look further how it is done.

To clarify, I am using unicode examples here. I only did that to demonstrate that there are unicode characters to handle this. At least, there are the vertical versions. So maybe LaTeX uses those. What I am really interested in though is, using a modern font in LaTeX (maybe a modern math font, though I don't know what the difference is), such as an OpenType font, how the brackets (horizontal and vertical) are constructed, and how they are mapped into the TeX system.

  • Are you aware of this question? – user121799 Aug 3 '18 at 3:51
  • See also Unicode math at TeX primitive level. – Alan Munn Aug 3 '18 at 4:07
  • I don't understand how that would work for () regular parentheses, the scaling technique. Or for the 〉angle brackets. – Lance Pollard Aug 3 '18 at 5:51
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    Stacking of glyphs for the parentheses is done by the font shaper (at least for Unicode math fonts but that's what you are referring to in the question) which makes this sort of off-topic. – Henri Menke Aug 3 '18 at 5:59
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    you write "latex" but then talk of unicode fonts that latex can not use. Are you asking about classic tex or about xetex/luatex and opentype math fonts (the details are different, although in either case a range of designed delimiters is used then finally constructed delimiters made of small characters that can be stacked to make arbitrary size) – David Carlisle Aug 3 '18 at 6:18

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