2

I'm trying to draw a transformer with multiple windings with circuitikz similar to the figure shown here (except I'd like to have multiple primary windings and a single secondary winding):

enter image description here

(Source: https://sub.allaboutcircuits.com/images/02141.png)

I have code for a single winding transformer here:

\begin{circuitikz}[american]
\draw (0,0) node [transformer core](T){}
      (T.A1) node[above] {A1}
      (T.A2) node[below] {A2}
      (T.B1) node[above] {B1} 
      (T.B2) node[below] {B2}
      (T.base) node{K};
\draw (T.A1) --++(-2,0);
\draw (T.A2) --++(-2,0);
\draw (T.B1) --++(2,0);
\draw (T.B2) --++(2,0);
\end{circuitikz}

The output is shown here: enter image description here

Is there a way to adapt this to have three windings on the primary side and one winding on the secondary side?

1
  • 2
    you need to compose transformer from inductors.
    – Zarko
    Aug 11 '18 at 21:47
4

Here is one way to achieve this diagram

enter image description here

\documentclass[margin=0.5cm]{standalone}
\usepackage{circuitikz}

\begin{document}

\ctikzset{bipoles/thickness=1} 
\begin{circuitikz}[line width=0.25mm]

\draw (0,0) to[L] ++ (0,1.5) --++ (2,0) to[R, bipoles/length=1cm, l=load \#2] ++ (0,-1.5) --++ (-2,0);
\draw (0,2) to[L] ++ (0,1.5) --++ (2,0) to[R, bipoles/length=1cm, l=load \#1] ++ (0,-1.5) --++ (-2,0);
\draw (-0.8,0.75) to[L, mirror] ++ (0,2) --++ (-2,0) to[sV] ++ (0,-2) --++ (2,0);
\draw (-0.33,0.25) -- (-0.33,3.25);
\draw (-0.47,0.25) -- (-0.47,3.25);

\end{circuitikz}
\end{document}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.