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I am trying to use flalign environment, but the tag is not centered. I know that each entry after \\ is taken as an independent equation in flalign, but is there a way to produce the same result below with a vertically centered tag?

enter image description here

\documentclass{IEEEtran}

\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.3}
\newcommand {\scalelinespace} [1] {\rule{0pt}{#1\normalbaselineskip}}
\usepackage{amsmath}


\begin{document}

\newcommand{\graphpath}[3][L]{\zeta_{\substack{\vspace{0.5mm} \\ #1}}
    \left[\upsilon_{#2}, \thinspace \upsilon_{#3}\right]
                            }

\begin{flalign}
    &&  \graphpath[L]{l}{m}
        = &\left[\upsilon_{l}, \thinspace \upsilon_{x_{1}}, \thinspace \upsilon_{x_{2}}, \thinspace \cdots, \thinspace x_{n}, \thinspace \upsilon_{m} \right] & \hspace{1mm}
\\
    \text{where} && &\phantom{\left[\right.} l \neq x_{1} \neq x_{2} \cdots \neq n \neq m & \hspace{1mm}
    \notag
\end{flalign}

\end{document}
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  • Why do you use flalign since you have at most one alignment point?
    – Bernard
    Aug 19, 2018 at 22:26
  • I want to use it because I want to save space. I could have used align, but if I had inserted 'where' using intertext, it would have taken a whole line on its own. What I want is to flush 'where' to the very left end and align two lines of the equations, but assign one tag for both of them (because one is just a condition to satisfy) Aug 19, 2018 at 22:34
  • Semantically, I don't feel necessary to align both lines, so the condition could be inserted in the \intertext.
    – Bernard
    Aug 19, 2018 at 22:39
  • I understand fully that the alignment may not be really necessary, but some reviewers need to be spoon-fed everything, so I work as hard as I can to make the text as clear as it could get. Aug 19, 2018 at 22:43

1 Answer 1

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I can propose these two variants, which rely on the fleqn environment from nccmath: it makes equations aligned at the left margin for equations inside the environment (works like subequations)Inside I put an aligned with two columns, nested in an equation environment:

\documentclass{IEEEtran}

\renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.3}
\newcommand {\scalelinespace} [1] {\rule{0pt}{#1\normalbaselineskip}}
\usepackage{amsmath, nccmath}

\begin{document} 

\newcommand{\graphpath}[3][L]{\zeta_{\mkern-1.5mu#1\strut}
\left[\upsilon_{#2}, \,\upsilon_{#3}\right]
                        }

\begin{fleqn}
\begin{equation}
\begin{aligned}
    && \graphpath[L]{l}{m}
        = &\left[\upsilon_{l}, \,\upsilon_{x_{1}}, \,\upsilon_{x_{2}}, \, \cdots, \, x_{n}, \,\upsilon_{m} \right] 
\\
    \text{where} && &\phantom{\left[\right.} l \neq x_{1} \neq x_{2} \cdots \neq n \neq m 
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
\end{fleqn}
\begin{fleqn}
\vskip3ex
\begin{equation}
\begin{aligned}
    && &\graphpath[L]{l}{m}
=\left[\upsilon_{l}, \thinspace \upsilon_{x_{1}}, \,\upsilon_{x_{2}}, \,\cdots, \,  x_{n}, \, \upsilon_{m} \right] 
\\
    \text{where} && & l\neq x_{1}\neq x_{2}\cdots \neq n \neq m 
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
\end{fleqn}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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  • Excellent solution! But I disagree with all my heart how the OP uses \substack{\vspace{0.5mm} \\ #1} and \left[...\right]. Also, writing consecutive \neq’s are questionable and could be very confusing… I’d prefer something like where $l$, $x_1$, $x_2$, \dots, $n$, $m$ are distinct indices. Aug 19, 2018 at 23:02
  • @Ruixi Zhang: I confess I didn't look at this part of the code. I suppose it's to have a lower placement of the subscript when it's a capital letter. Do you have another solution?
    – Bernard
    Aug 19, 2018 at 23:08
  • Yes, Bernard is right. It just about lowering the subscript. Try to remove \substack{\vspace{0.5mm} \\ #1} and replace it with #1 alone. It will look not yield a good appearance when using the letter 'L' Aug 19, 2018 at 23:27
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    @Al-MotasemAldaoudeyeh: I propose another, simpler definition for \graphicspath, with a tighter horizontal spacing for the index. PLease see the updated code and the resulting screenshot. B.t.w., \thinspace is just \, (simpler to type).
    – Bernard
    Aug 20, 2018 at 0:13

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