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I have generated a minimal working example of an issue I'm having. I'm simple writing in an article document type, and for some reason the enumerate environment is flushing left. I would like it to be normally indented relative to the surrounding text.

Below is the offending code and a picture of what it looks like.


\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{geometry}
\geometry{legalpaper, portrait, margin=1in}
\usepackage{amssymb}


\begin{document}
\section{Fermat's Little Theorem using Group Theory}

Fermat's Little Theorem (1637): For any integer $n$ and prime $p>n$, $n^p\equiv n\,(\mod p)$.

\vspace{2mm}

Two preliminary theorems:

\begin{enumerate}
\item[1. Bezout's Identity:] Let $a,b\in\mathbb{Z}$ (but not both zero) and $d=\gcd (a,b)$. There always exists at least one pair of integers $(x,y)$ such that:

$$ax+by=d$$


\item[2. Lagrange's Theorem]: For any finite group $G$ and subgroup $H$, the order of $H$ divides $G$, i.e. $[G]=k[H]$ for some $k\in \mathbb{Z}_+$.
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

5

This is due to the use of very long item labels. You should eventually use the description environment like it is (very well) described in this post.

2

You're abusing enumerate and also colons (but the latter is a stylistic remark).

You want a description, instead.

I also made a few TeX correction:

  1. there is no need for \vspace{2mm};
  2. there must never be a blank line before a displayed formula;
  3. $$ should never be used in LaTeX.

The mathematical corrections:

  1. the restriction that a and b are not both zero is redundant;
  2. the restriction that p > n is likewise redundant.

Fixed code.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\geometry{legalpaper, portrait, margin=1in}

\begin{document}
\section{Fermat's Little Theorem using Group Theory}

\textbf{Fermat's Little Theorem (1637).} For any integer $n$ and 
prime $p$, $n^p\equiv n\pmod{p}$.

Two preliminary theorems.

\begin{description}
\item[1. Bezout's Identity.] Let $a,b\in\mathbb{Z}$ and $d=\gcd (a,b)$. 
There exists at least one pair of integers $(x,y)$ such that 
\[
ax+by=d
\]

\item[2. Lagrange's Theorem.] For any finite group $G$ and subgroup $H$,
the order of $H$ divides $G$, i.e. $[G]=k[H]$ for some $k\in \mathbb{Z}_+$.
\end{description}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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