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This question already has an answer here:

Early 20th century texts on calculus of variations use a very strongly slanted Delta. A sample is below. It is much more slanted than the \mathit{\Delta} discussed in Delta-like symbol in LaTeX, and more slanted than in A particular big Delta

The specific difference is that I want the upper vertex farther to the right than the bottom right one.

How can I match this in LaTeX?

enter image description here

marked as duplicate by Milo, Troy, Sebastiano, siracusa, Zarko Aug 28 '18 at 21:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    @StevenB.Segletes the accepted answer to that question is irrelevant to me, but your answer to it does answer my question. – Colin McLarty Aug 28 '18 at 15:28
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    This question has been closed, but the stix font (Also available in OpenType as XITS Math) a slanted \mathit{\Delta} that looks much like this. It is, however, a relatively thick font. In unicode-math, you can also \setmathfont with the range=\mitDelta and FakeSlant options. – Davislor Aug 31 '18 at 3:36
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    Cambria Math has an even more slanted \mitDelta, and might be a better match for the weight of your other fonts. So, perhaps \setmathfont[range=\mitDelta, Scale=MatchUppercase]{Cambria Math} after your primary \setmathfont. – Davislor Aug 31 '18 at 3:38
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Disclaimer: The real answer to this question is does this symbol exist somewhere in a math font. That I do not know. But, just as a proof of concept, you could create the symbol using TikZ. Whether this is a good idea and how this fits with your math font of choice is another matter.

I've called the symbol \SDelta and it is scaled using scalerel to match the size of \Delta.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usepackage{scalerel}

\newcommand{\SDelta}{\scalerel*{%
\tikz{\draw (0.2,0) coordinate (RBASE) --(0,0) coordinate (LBASE) --++(45:0.32) coordinate (TOP) --cycle;
\draw [line width=0.25mm] ([xshift=-0.01cm]RBASE)--([xshift=-0.01cm,yshift=-0.015cm]TOP);
\draw  ([yshift=0.005cm]RBASE)--([yshift=0.005cm]LBASE);
}}{\Delta}}

\begin{document}
\[
\SDelta J = \int_{t_0}^t \SDelta F \, \mathrm{d}t 
\]
\[\scriptstyle
\SDelta J = \int_{t_0}^t \SDelta F \, \mathrm{d}t 
\]
\[
\Delta J = \int_{t_0}^t \Delta F \, \mathrm{d}t 
\]
\[\scriptstyle
\Delta J = \int_{t_0}^t \Delta F \, \mathrm{d}t 
\]
\end{document}
  • I like this since all my documents use TiKZ anyway. – Colin McLarty Aug 28 '18 at 15:32
  • Possibly consider wrapping in \mathord{} so that it has the same spacing as \Delta? Is that necessary? – Davislor Aug 31 '18 at 3:29
  • The recent comments show how to get the character I want by a simple font choice, more practical than using TiKZ for this. – Colin McLarty Sep 1 '18 at 12:24

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