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I want to make several words with a grey background like this within normal text? Like with \colorbox{yellow}{\lstinline{some text here}} but grey instead of yellow. How to do that?

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    Have you tried replacing yellow with gray, i.e. \colorbox{gray}{...}? You could also define your own, lighter gray color (e.g. \definecolor{light-gray}{gray}{0.89}). – chrisma Aug 28 '18 at 14:38
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    Simply with \colorbox{grey}{ ... }. Or did I misunderstand? – Bernard Aug 28 '18 at 14:38
  • @chrisma This works "\colorbox{yellow}{sadef}". This "\colorbox{gray}{sdfASDF}" gives error "Undefined color gray'. \colorbox{gray}{sdfASDF}". This "\colorbox{grey}{sdfASDF}" gives error "Undefined color grey'. \colorbox{grey}{sdfASDF}". – vasili111 Aug 28 '18 at 14:46
  • @chrisma This works "\colorbox{yellow}{sadef}". This "\colorbox{gray}{sdfASDF}" gives error "Undefined color gray'. \colorbox{gray}{sdfASDF}". This "\colorbox{grey}{sdfASDF}" gives error "Undefined color grey'. \colorbox{grey}{sdfASDF}". – vasili111 Aug 28 '18 at 14:46
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    Did you load xcolor? – Bernard Aug 28 '18 at 14:51
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As you write in your question you use \colorbox. As the first argument is simply a color name you need to exchange yellow for gray or one of the other defined colors from xcolor (first column is name):

\definecolorset{rgb/hsb/cmyk/gray}{}{}%
 {red,1,0,0/0,1,1/0,1,1,0/.3;%
  green,0,1,0/.33333,1,1/1,0,1,0/.59;%
  blue,0,0,1/.66667,1,1/1,1,0,0/.11;%
  brown,.75,.5,.25/.083333,.66667,.75/0,.25,.5,.25/.5475;%
  lime,.75,1,0/.20833,1,1/.25,0,1,0/.815;%
  orange,1,.5,0/.083333,1,1/0,.5,1,0/.595;%
  pink,1,.75,.75/0,.25,1/0,.25,.25,0/.825;%
  purple,.75,0,.25/.94444,1,.75/0,.75,.5,.25/.2525;%
  teal,0,.5,.5/.5,1,.5/.5,0,0,.5/.35;%
  violet,.5,0,.5/.83333,1,.5/0,.5,0,.5/.205}%
\definecolorset{cmyk/rgb/hsb/gray}{}{}%
 {cyan,1,0,0,0/0,1,1/.5,1,1/.7;%
  magenta,0,1,0,0/1,0,1/.83333,1,1/.41;%
  yellow,0,0,1,0/1,1,0/.16667,1,1/.89;%
  olive,0,0,1,.5/.5,.5,0/.16667,1,.5/.39}
\definecolorset{gray/rgb/hsb/cmyk}{}{}%
 {black,0/0,0,0/0,0,0/0,0,0,1;%
  darkgray,.25/.25,.25,.25/0,0,.25/0,0,0,.75;%
  gray,.5/.5,.5,.5/0,0,.5/0,0,0,.5;%
  lightgray,.75/.75,.75,.75/0,0,.75/0,0,0,.25;%
  white,1/1,1,1/0,0,1/0,0,0,0}

Example:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{xcolor}


\begin{document}

werwe \colorbox{lightgray}{sdfASDF} wqerwqe

\end{document}
  • I added an example. Please approve if you agree. – vasili111 Aug 28 '18 at 15:31
3

The svgnames option of xcolor defines a number of shades of grey. Furthermore, you can mix colours easily. Here's a demo:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[svgnames]{xcolor}


\begin{document}

 \colorbox{lightgray}{sdfASDF} \medskip

 \colorbox{Gainsboro}{sdfASDF} \medskip

 \colorbox{Gainsboro!60!Lavender}{sdfASDF}\medskip

 \colorbox{WhiteSmoke}{sdfASDF} \medskip

 \colorbox{WhiteSmoke!70!Lavender}{sdfASDF}

\end{document} 

Explanation (valid for 2 colours): Gainsboro!60!Lavender means 60 % of Gainsboro and 40% of Lavender.

Gainboro!70 would mean 70 % of Gainsbor and 30 % of white.

enter image description here

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