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I am trying to LaTeX my old hand written notes. I am finding several glitches. Consider following code. How can I shift equation numbers to right. I used fleqn and align and flalign unsuccessfully. I am sure there is a short brief answer to this. I am pasting code without align and flalign tries.

\documentclass {amsart}
\usepackage{amsthm, amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb}
\usepackage[fleqn]{mathtools}
\newtheorem{Def}[]{Definition}

\begin{document} 
\begin{flushleft}\text{Real Number System The rational and irrantional numbers constitute the real number system.}\end{flushleft}
\begin{Def}
\underline{Rational Numbers:} a/b or p/q form: Numbers which are Quotient (Remainder) of two integers, with non zero denominator are called rational numbers e.g.,\begin{equation}\frac{1}{2},\frac{7}{5},-3,-4 \end{equation}  etc.
\end{Def}
\begin{Def}
\underline{Irrational Numbers:}Those real numbers which are not rational are called irrational e.g., the numbers \begin{equation}\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3},e, \pi, e^{\pi}\end{equation}
\end{Def}
\end{document}
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There are a few points where you can improve your sample document.

  1. \text should not be used in that context.
  2. Instead of flushleft I suggest using a \section command for the header and standard text after it.
  3. The text in definitions is usually printed upright, with the exception of the defined term, for which you can use \emph.
  4. The fleqn option should be passed to the document class, because it automatically loads amsmath and passing fleqn to mathtools does nothing.
  5. a/b and p/q are math formulas, so they should be segregated in \(...\) (or $...$, if you prefer) notwithstanding whether they appear in an italic context.
  6. Underlining is a frowned upon typographic device.

The main point is however that amsart uses by default leqno, so it has to be overridden with the reqno option.

\documentclass[reqno,fleqn]{amsart}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\theoremstyle{definition}
\newtheorem{Def}{Definition}

\begin{document}

\section*{Real Number System}
The rational and irrational numbers constitute the real number system.

\begin{Def}
\emph{Rational Numbers}: $a/b$ or $p/q$ form: Numbers which are Quotient (Remainder)
of two integers, with non zero denominator are called rational numbers e.g.,
\begin{equation}
\frac{1}{2},\frac{7}{5},-3,-4
\end{equation}
etc.
\end{Def}

\begin{Def}
\emph{Irrational Numbers}: Those real numbers which are not rational are called
irrational e.g., the numbers
\begin{equation}
\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3},e, \pi, e^{\pi}
\end{equation}
\end{Def}

\end{document}

Note that amssymb automatically loads amsfonts and that amsthm is incorporated into amsart.

enter image description here

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The default options in amsart are:

\ExecuteOptions{leqno,centertags,letterpaper,portrait,%
  10pt,twoside,onecolumn,final}

The leqno option makes left aligned equation numbers. If you use \documentclass[reqno]{amsart} it will do:

enter image description here

I removed the flushleft, which is preventing the paragraph indentation.

Also, in text mode, the \text command does an \mbox, which prevents the line breaking in "number system".

You also have a typo in "irrantional" and a missing space after \underline{Irrational Numbers:}.

\documentclass[reqno]{amsart}
\usepackage{amsthm, amsmath, amsfonts, amssymb}
\usepackage[fleqn]{mathtools}
\newtheorem{Def}[]{Definition}

\begin{document}
Real Number System The rational and irrational numbers constitute the real number system.
\begin{Def}
\underline{Rational Numbers:} a/b or p/q form: Numbers which are Quotient (Remainder) of two integers, with non zero denominator are called rational numbers e.g.,\begin{equation}\frac{1}{2},\frac{7}{5},-3,-4 \end{equation} etc.
\end{Def}
\begin{Def}
\underline{Irrational Numbers:} Those real numbers which are not rational are called irrational e.g., the numbers \begin{equation}\sqrt{2}, \sqrt{3},e, \pi, e^{\pi}\end{equation}
\end{Def}
\end{document}
  • 1
    \text should be removed. And also flushleft, which seems used for avoiding the indent. – egreg Sep 5 '18 at 14:13

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