5

I can remember that I might get a easy solution, but now I can't find this in this site.

$ whereis pdflatex
pdflatex: /usr/bin/pdflatex /usr/bin/X11/pdflatex /usr/share/man/man1/pdflatex.1.gz

But, updated installation location is

/usr/local/texlive/2018/bin/x86_64-linux

Some solution

Set PATH to use the current TeX Live bin directory

TeXlive update - how do I permanently set the path?

How do I configure the paths for TexLive2011 to work on my system with TexWorks 0.5?

2
  • 1
    What operating system are we talking?
    – Joseph Wright
    Oct 22, 2018 at 13:43
  • @JosephWright Ubuntu
    – alhelal
    Oct 22, 2018 at 13:55

1 Answer 1

4

Open your .bashrc script and write the following lines at the end:

PATH=/usr/local/texlive/2018/bin/x86_64-linux:$PATH; export PATH MANPATH=/usr/local/texlive/2018/texmf-dist/doc/man:$MANPATH; export MANPATH INFOPATH=/usr/local/texlive/2018/texmf-dist/doc/info:$INFOPATH; export INFOPATH

And then you should be good to go.

4
  • 1
    That is actually insufficient. If you start your editor from a menu it will never see the addition from bashrc. Make sure to also add it to .profile, log out and in again (.profile is only read at login)
    – daleif
    Oct 22, 2018 at 14:15
  • I am sorry I should have mentioned that. Either put it in your .bash_profile too or just source your .bashrc in your .bash_profile. Both works fine for me.
    – Mibi
    Oct 22, 2018 at 14:21
  • Remember not all systems use bash_profile
    – daleif
    Oct 22, 2018 at 14:23
  • If I am correct, .bashrc is a config file read by BASH each time one connects to "interactive" shells (terminals or pseudo-terminal in the case of a terminal emulator running under a windowing system etc.) It means adding to PATH will be repeated each time the terminal is open. I think .profile is the correct config file for PATH-like definitions in Ubuntu.
    – Celdor
    Jan 18 at 9:48

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