4

Can anybody tell me the LaTeX character code for the upper-case 'H' character with crossbeam in the upper segment (as in 'Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum' (Malta))? Thank you.

  • Perhaps the maltese package will help you. – David Purton Nov 15 '18 at 12:16
  • 1
    This works in a straightforward way if you use a LaTeX engine that supports Unicode, such as lualatex or xelatex. Simply include the Unicode character directly in your LaTeX source code, and make sure that you use a font that contains that glyph (which is the case for example for Linux Libertine). – Eric Marsden Nov 15 '18 at 12:21
  • Thank you, but maltese package did not work -- the additional crossbeam of the 'H' was added, but it was positioned too high, sitting across the very top part of the letter and not half way between the top and the normal medial crossbeam. egreg's solution worked, however. – Steven Jan Nov 23 '18 at 12:52
6

Unfortunately, H with crossbeam is not supported by the T1 encoding.

Here's a way to produce it.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{newunicodechar}

\makeatletter
\DeclareRobustCommand{\Hcrossbeam}{%
  \hmode@bgroup
  \vphantom{H}%
  \sbox\z@{H}%
  \ooalign{%
    H\cr
    \hidewidth
    \vrule
      height \dimexpr 0.7\ht\z@+0.1ex\relax
      depth  -0.7\ht\z@
      width  0.8\wd\z@
    \hidewidth\cr
  }%
  \egroup
}
\DeclareRobustCommand{\hcrossbeam}{%
  \hmode@bgroup
  \vphantom{h}%
  \sbox\z@{h}%
  \ooalign{%
    h\cr
    \kern0.075\wd\z@
    \vrule
      height \dimexpr 0.7\ht\z@+0.1ex\relax
      depth  -0.7\ht\z@
      width  0.4\wd\z@
    \hidewidth\cr
  }%
  \egroup
}
\makeatother
\newunicodechar{Ħ}{\Hcrossbeam}
\newunicodechar{ħ}{\hcrossbeam}

\begin{document}

HĦ\Hcrossbeam {\LARGE HĦ\Hcrossbeam}

\medskip

hħ\hcrossbeam {\LARGE hħ\hcrossbeam}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Different fonts might need different parameters.

  • Thank you very much -- this worked perfectly. – Steven Jan Nov 23 '18 at 12:49
  • @StevenJan In the next release of LaTeX there will be \Hwithstroke and \hwithstroke. It was decided to stick with the Unicode name. Also Ħ and ħ will be legal as soon as (the default) UTF-8 encoding is used. – egreg Nov 23 '18 at 12:54

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