I am using this to represent a limit:

\lim _{b\rightarrow \infty }

But the limit expression gets on the side of the lim symbol.

enter image description here

I want it to be under lim.

I see that in some LaTeX represented versions, it appears in a correct way.

I use the following packages:

\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[osf,slantedGreek]{mathpazo}
  • 2
    \lim\limits_{b\to\infty}. But are you sure you really want it? – GuM Dec 6 at 17:52
  • Outside of a math environment $\displaystyle \lim_{b \rightarrow \infty}$ should do what you want. – epR8GaYuh Dec 6 at 17:53
  • @GuM Thank you, I could go without it, I guess I want it because I am used to see it in this way and it looks more aesthetic to me. – Alvaro Franz Dec 6 at 17:57
  • @epR8GaYuh Thank you. This makes me wonder what an environment is in LaTeX, gotta research. – Alvaro Franz Dec 6 at 17:58
  • 2
    you could do as the comments above say but note this completely breaks the intention of inline math layout which is not to disturb the line spacing of the paragraph. If you need that layout it is better to use a display math construct such as \[...\] – David Carlisle Dec 6 at 18:02
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The textstyle layout is designed not to disturb the interline spacing in the surrounding paragraph. If you force the use of limits style on math operators, or worse, force the use of displaystyle for the whole inline expression, the line spacing is disturbed and it is hard to see the paragraph as a unit of text. If the expression is complicated enough to require this, it is better to set it using a display construct such as \[\] rather than inline.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}


\begin{document}

\section{inline textstyle}
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
$\lim_{b\to-\infty} \frac{x}{b} = ?$
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 


\section{inline textstyle with limits}
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
$\lim\limits_{b\to-\infty} \frac{x}{b} = ?$
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 

\section{inline displaystyle}
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
$\displaystyle\lim_{b\to-\infty} \frac{x}{b} = ?$
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 

\section{display}
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
\[\lim_{b\to-\infty} \frac{x}{b} = ?\]
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 
The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. The cat sat on the mat. 







\end{document}

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