3

How to make a bigger space between equation and its number? Thank you.

\begin{document}
\begin{equation}\label{apsidalni}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \left[k_{2,1} (15qf(e) + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5+k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)+\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \right]
\end{equation}
\end{document}

enter image description here

4

Here are a few suggestions. You can move down the equation number by adding an invisible object, here \rule[-36pt]{0pt}{36pt} ({0pt}{0pt} means zero width and height, but the optional value -36pt tells TeX to move down the invisible rule by the stated amount); of course 36pt is exaggerated, use a smaller value.

On the other hand, splitting the equation seems better, so I add a couple of ways for it.

\documentclass[a4paper]{article}
\usepackage[left=4cm,right=4cm]{geometry}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\usepackage[nopar]{lipsum} % for context

\numberwithin{equation}{section}

\begin{document}

\setcounter{section}{3}\setcounter{equation}{21}

\lipsum[4][1-5]
\begin{equation}\label{apsidalni}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \left[k_{2,1} (15qf(e)
  + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5+k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)
  +\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \right]
\end{equation}
\lipsum[4][1-5]
\begin{equation}\label{apsidalni-lowered}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \left[k_{2,1} (15qf(e)
  + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5+k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)
  +\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \right]
\rule[-36pt]{0pt}{0pt}
\end{equation}
\lipsum[4][1-5]
\begin{multline}\label{apsidalni-multline}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \biggl[k_{2,1} (15qf(e)
  + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5
\\
  +k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)
  +\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \biggr]
\end{multline}
\lipsum[4][1-5]
\begingroup
\addtolength{\multlinegap}{4em}
\begin{multline}\label{apsidalni-multline-gap}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \biggl[k_{2,1} (15qf(e)
  + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5
\\
  +k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)
  +\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \biggr]
\end{multline}
\endgroup
\lipsum[4][1-5]

\end{document}

Here I guessed the text width based on your image.

enter image description here

4

Here are three ways: either you split the equation on two lines (with multline or with a nested aligned), or you use the \medmath command, from nccmath, which makes its argument about 80 % of \displaysize.

Also, if you don't use margin notes, you can have more decent margins just loading the geometry package.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathtools, nccmath}
\usepackage{showframe}
\renewcommand{\ShowFrameLinethickness}{0.3pt}

\begin{document}

\begin{multline}\label{apsidalni}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \biggl[k_{2,1} (15qf(e) + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5 \\
+k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)+\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \biggr]
\end{multline}
\bigskip
\begin{equation}\label{apsidalni-1}
\begin{aligned}
\omega_c = \frac{360}{P} \biggl[k_{2,1} (15qf(e) & + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5 \\
& + k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)+\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \biggr]
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
\bigskip

\begin{equation}\label{apsidalni-2}
\omega_c = \medmath{\frac{360}{P} \biggl[k_{2,1} (15qf(e) + (1+q)g(e,1))r_1^5 \\
+k_{2,2}\left(\frac{15}{q}f(e)+\left(1+\frac{1}{q}\right)g(e,2)\right)r_2^5 \biggr]}
\end{equation}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

  • 1
    You could also mention the \raisetag command (see section 3.8 of the manual of the amsmath package), which does exactly what the OP asked for, nothing more, nothing less. – GuM Dec 9 '18 at 14:34
  • 1
    You can't use \raisetag for a single line equation – the label would be messed up with the equation. – Bernard Dec 9 '18 at 15:34
  • Yes, I knew that: admittedly, my comment was ambiguous. I meant to suggest that you mentioned \raisetag in connection with the multline environment, and the other environments that amsmath provides for groups of displayed equations. And before you object: yes, even in these environments, \raisetag is not effective if the equation number fits in the same line as the equation… ;-) – GuM Dec 9 '18 at 18:39

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