4

I want to be able to have an acronym in glossary, which when referred to with \gls{} would appear in the main text in a standard form, unless specified otherwise.

I.e. i have the following acronyms:

\newacronym{a1}{A1}{Apples 1}
\newacronym{a2}{A2}{Apples 2}

I am writing about two types of apples, A1 and A2. But i am mostly interested in A1, so i just want them to be abbreviated as A from now on. So i guess i'm looking whether something like the following exists:

\newacronym{a1}{A}{A1}{Apples 1}
\gls{a1}

(abbreviation appears as A)

\gls{a1}[version2]

(abbreviation appears as A1).

Are there any standard options in glossary for this?

3

There are several methods that I can think of.

1. Just the base glossaries package.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}
\usepackage[style=tree]{glossaries}

\makeglossaries

\setacronymstyle{long-short}
\newacronym{a}{A}{Apples}
\newacronym[parent=a]{a1}{A1}{Apples 1}
\newacronym[parent=a]{a2}{A2}{Apples 2}

\begin{document}
First use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

Next use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

\printglossaries
\end{document}

This establishes a hierarchical set of abbreviations:

image of document

The \gls{a} reference links to the parent entry in the list.

2. The glossaries-extra extension package.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}
\usepackage[style=tree]{glossaries-extra}

\makeglossaries

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}

\newacronym{a1}{A1}{Apples 1}
\newacronym{a2}{A2}{Apples 2}

\newglossaryentry{a}{name={A},description={Apples},alias={a1}}

\begin{document}
First use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

Next use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

\printglossaries
\end{document}

This uses the alias key that makes the hyperlink for \gls{a} go to the target for a1. The aliased entry is listed in the glossary with a cross-reference:

image of document

The first use of \gls{a} doesn't show the full form as it's not an abbreviation. It can be an abbreviation if you prefer:

\newacronym[alias=a1]{a}{A}{Apples}

If you don't want the aliased term to appear at all in the list, you can create an ignored glossary and assign it to that:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}
\usepackage[style=tree]{glossaries-extra}

\makeglossaries

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}

\newacronym{a1}{A1}{Apples 1}
\newacronym{a2}{A2}{Apples 2}

\newignoredglossary*{ignored}
\newglossaryentry{a}{name={A},description={Apples},alias={a1},type=ignored}

\begin{document}
First use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

Next use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

\printglossaries
\end{document}

The \gls{a} reference links to the main glossary even though a is in an ignored glossary that doesn't show up with \printglossaries.

image of document

3. The glossaries-extra extension package and bib2gls.

This assigns a post-link hook for the aliased entry (which now has the category label aliased) so that on first use it will show both terms.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@acronym{a1,
  short={A1},
  long={Apples 1}
}
@acronym{a2,
  short={A2},
  long={Apples 2}
}
@index{a,
  name={A},
  alias={a1},
  seealso={a1,a2},
  category={aliased}
}
\end{filecontents*}

\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}
\usepackage[style=tree,record]{glossaries-extra}

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}

\GlsXtrLoadResources[
  src={\jobname}% entries in \jobname.bib
]

\glsdefpostlink{aliased}{%
 \glsxtrifwasfirstuse
 {%
   \glsxtrifhasfield{seealso}{\glslabel}%
   {%
     \let\DTLlistformatitem\glsxtrlong
     \space(\DTLformatlist{\glscurrentfieldvalue})%
   }%
   {}%
 }%
 {}%
}

\begin{document}
First use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

Next use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

\renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryentryprocesshook}[1]{%
  \glsxtrifhasfield*{alias}{#1}{\printunsrtglossaryskipentry}{}%
}
\printunsrtglossaries
\end{document}

Instead of creating an ignored glossary, I've redefined the hook used by \printunsrtglossary to skip any entry that has the alias field set.

image of document

The command \glsdefpostlink was new to glossaries-extra v1.31. If you have an older version you can change:

\glsdefpostlink{aliased}{%

to:

\newcommand{\glsxtrpostlinkaliased}{%

Here's a minor variation that includes a description for the aliased entry:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@acronym{a1,
  short={A1},
  long={Apples 1}
}
@acronym{a2,
  short={A2},
  long={Apples 2}
}
@entry{a,
  name={A},
  description={Apples},
  alias={a1},
  seealso={a1,a2},
  category={aliased}
}
\end{filecontents*}

\usepackage[colorlinks]{hyperref}
\usepackage[style=tree,record]{glossaries-extra}

\setabbreviationstyle[acronym]{long-short}

\GlsXtrLoadResources[
  src={\jobname}% entries in \jobname.bib
]

\glsdefpostlink{aliased}{%
 \glsxtrifwasfirstuse
 {%
   \space(\glsentrydesc{\glslabel}%
     \glsxtrifhasfield{seealso}{\glslabel}%
     {%
       \let\DTLlistformatitem\glsxtrlong
       :\space\DTLformatlist{\glscurrentfieldvalue}%
     }%
     {}%
   )%
 }%
 {}%
}

\begin{document}
First use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

Next use: \gls{a1}, \gls{a2}, \gls{a}.

\renewcommand{\printunsrtglossaryentryprocesshook}[1]{%
  \glsxtrifhasfield*{alias}{#1}{\printunsrtglossaryskipentry}{}%
}
\printunsrtglossaries
\end{document}

image of document

4
  • Thanks for the detailed answer, Nicola! I don't want A to appear in the Glossary and your option 2 seemed the easiest one to implement, but your code does not seem to work for me: ! LaTeX Error: Missing \begin{document}. l.13 \newignoredglossary*{i gnored} ! Package xkeyval Error: alias' undefined in families glossentry'. l.14 ...cription={Apples},alias={a1},type=ignored} – InternazionalIV Dec 13 '18 at 14:02
  • @InternazionalIV The alias key was added to glossaries-extra version 1.12 (2017-02-03) so I suspect your version is too old. – Nicola Talbot Dec 13 '18 at 14:12
  • Right you are! Thanks!! Ready to submit my dissertation about the apples now.. – InternazionalIV Dec 16 '18 at 17:53
  • @InternazionalIV Good luck with it :-) – Nicola Talbot Dec 16 '18 at 22:33

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