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edit: on request of the immer polite and very helpful @mico

Author names should always start with a capital letter, My university requires names in citation call-outs to always start with a capital letter, even when the author's name is 'van Oostrom'. Natbib=true lets me use Cite instead of cite which basically tells latex to force a first capital letter.

Is there a way to make \textcquote behave the same way?

enter image description here

MWE

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[dutch]{babel}               % Nederlands
\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents*}{refs.bib}
@book{vanOostrom2013,
    langid = {dutch},
    location = {{Amsterdam}},
    title = {Wereld in Woorden},
    publisher = {{Uitgeverij Bert Bakker}},
    date = {2013},
    author = {van Oostrom, Fritz},
    options = {useprefix=true}
}

\end{filecontents*}

\usepackage[dutch]{babel}               % Nederlands
\usepackage[autostyle]{csquotes}        % Context sensitive quotation facilities

\usepackage[bibstyle=ext-authoryear,citestyle=authoryear,giveninits=true,maxnames=3,doi=false,isbn=false,dashed=false,natbib=true,backend=biber]{biblatex}
\addbibresource{refs.bib}

\renewcommand*{\nameyeardelim}{\space}
\SetCiteCommand{\parencite}

\begin{document}

\begin{itemize}  
    \item \cite{vanOostrom2013}  is not what we want. the V must always be capitalized.
    \item luckily \Cite{vanOostrom2013} will fix this for us
    \item same for \Citeauthor{vanOostrom2013}, \Citet{vanOostrom2013} and even \Autocite{vanOostrom2013}
\end{itemize}

Sometimes, however, I want to quote \textcquote*{vanOostrom2013}{Some Famous words}.
And then I would need \underline{\textit{Tectcquote}} which does not exists...

\end{document}
  • 3
    Are you sure that the claim that "Author names [used in citation call-outs] should always start with a capital letter" is correct? [emphasis added) I thought that uppercasing of "van" in "van Oostrum" and of "de" in "de Vries" should occur if a sentence starts with a citation call-out; e.g., "De Vries (1999) argued that ...". That's precisely what natbib's \Citet, \Citealt, and \Citeauthor are there for. In contrast, there should be no need to uppercase "de" in the sentence "As argued by de Vries (1999), ...". – Mico Dec 14 '18 at 12:22
  • 4
    Can you imagine any circumstance in which (assuming your view that author names should always start with a capital is right, as I think it isn'=t!) the citation following a quote would not be capitalized? If not, you can replace \cite with \Cite globally: \SetCiteCommand{\Cite}. If you need more flexibility you will have more work to do. – Paul Stanley Dec 14 '18 at 12:43
  • 1
    I think your promoter (is that a synonym for "academic adviser"?) is simply wrong. If it were true that the first letter of a citation call-out must always be uppercased, the existing citation call-out commands (such as \citet and \citep) would long ago have implemented this rule. The very fact that \Citet and \Citeauthor even exist strongly suggests that they were created to handle exceptional cases, viz., citation call-outs at the beginning of a sentence. Clearly, though, you're stuck with an intransigent and dogmatic "promoter", and there's nothing you can do about it. Good luck. – Mico Dec 14 '18 at 12:51
  • 1
    You could have saved several readers a lot of time if you had started your posting with "My university requires names in citation call-outs to always start with a capital letter" instead of "[a]uthor names should always start with a capital letter"... – Mico Dec 14 '18 at 13:03
  • 2
    Note that it is not the natbib=true option that lets you use the capitalised \Cite commands, those are available even with the default natbib=false. natbib only enables natbib-like commands such as \citep (fot \parencite) and \citet (for \textcite) as well as \citealt, \citealp and a few other commands. Instead of bibstyle=ext-authoryear,citestyle=authoryear I would just use style=ext-authoryear. And for \renewcommand*{\nameyeardelim}{\space} I would prefer \DeclareDelimFormat{nameyeardelim}{\addspace} (but that should not be needed if you drop natbib=true). – moewe Dec 14 '18 at 13:15
4

The rules for capitalisations of name prefixes like 'van', 'von', ... wary wildly between languages and regions. Since you load babel with the dutch option it is fair to assume you either want the Dutch spoken in the Netherlands or Flanders.

It is my understanding that in the Netherlands Dutch tussenvoegsels like 'de', 'van' and 'van der' are capitalised unless they are preceded by the first name (or name initial). To quote the slightly confusing English Wikipedia page on the subject Tussenvoegsel

According to Dutch language rules in the Netherlands, the tussenvoegsel in a surname is written with a capital letter only when it starts a sentence or is not preceded by a first name or initial.

(If the tussenvoegsel starts the sentence then it is not directly preceded by a first name or initial anyway...)

Example from Dutch media outlets: 'vertelde historicus Maarten van Rossem' vs. 'historici hadden volgens Van Rossem' https://www.volkskrant.nl/es-b7bd1412 or 'presentatiecollega Maarten van Rossem' https://www.groene.nl/artikel/o-la-la vs. 'In Nederland Van Rossem, Tromp, Koen Koch, Von der Dunk, ...' https://www.groene.nl/artikel/wie-is-schuldig.

Cf. also https://woordenlijst.org/leidraad/16/2, https://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/433, https://onzetaal.nl/taaladvies/hoofdletters-in-namen-nynke-van-der-sluis-nynke-van-der-sluis/ and the beautiful pictures in https://zichtbaarnederlands.nl/zn/spelling-achternamen.php

In Belgium (Flanders) the capitalisation of the tussenvoegsel depends on the 'official form' of the name as on official documents like IDs or passports. It is usually stated that names do not change capitalisation All examples I found assumed that at least the first tussenvoegsel is capitalised at all times. It would be interesting to see how names with a lowercase v would be treated without first name and at the beginning of a sentence...

From this I understand that Belgian tussenvoegsels should be input with capital letters in the .bib file as well, i.e. author = {Van Rossem, Jean-Pierre} (this will lead Biber/BibTeX to treat the Van as part of the family name and not as a prefix, which nicely fits with all sorting rules and the interpretation of https://zichtbaarnederlands.nl/zn/spelling-achternamen.php).


Given all these rules it seems to me that it makes little sense to use the capitalised \Cite form at all times. Instead I would change the name formatting macros to apply capitalisation if needed. The following implements the rules w.r.t capitalisation used in the Netherlands as I understand them

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[dutch]{babel}
\usepackage[autostyle]{csquotes}

\usepackage[style=ext-authoryear, giveninits=true, maxnames=3, doi=false, isbn=false, dashed=false, natbib=true, backend=biber]{biblatex}

\DeclareDelimFormat{nameyeardelim}{\addspace}
\SetCiteCommand{\parencite}

\newbibmacro*{name:family}[4]{%
  \ifuseprefix
    {\usebibmacro{name:delim}{#3#1}%
     \usebibmacro{name:hook}{#3#1}%
     \ifdefvoid{#3}
       {}
       {\mkbibnameprefix{\MakeCapital{#3}}\isdot
        \ifprefchar{}{\bibnamedelimc}}}
    {\usebibmacro{name:delim}{#1}%
     \usebibmacro{name:hook}{#1}}%
  \mkbibnamefamily{#1}\isdot}%

\newbibmacro*{name:given-family}[4]{%
  \usebibmacro{name:delim}{#2#3#1}%
  \usebibmacro{name:hook}{#2#3#1}%
  \ifdefvoid{#2}{}{\mkbibnamegiven{#2}\isdot\bibnamedelimd}%
  \ifdefvoid{#3}{}{%
    \ifdefvoid{#2}
      {\mkbibnameprefix{\MakeCapital{#3}}\isdot}
      {\mkbibnameprefix{#3}\isdot}%
    \ifprefchar
      {}
      {\ifuseprefix{\bibnamedelimc}{\bibnamedelimd}}}%
  \mkbibnamefamily{#1}\isdot
  \ifdefvoid{#4}{}{\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnamesuffix{#4}\isdot}}

\newbibmacro*{name:family-given}[4]{%
  \ifuseprefix
    {\usebibmacro{name:delim}{#3#1}%
     \usebibmacro{name:hook}{#3#1}%
     \ifdefvoid{#3}{}{%
       \mkbibnameprefix{\MakeCapital{#3}}\isdot
       \ifprefchar{}{\bibnamedelimc}}%
     \mkbibnamefamily{#1}\isdot
     \ifdefvoid{#4}{}{\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnamesuffix{#4}\isdot}%
     \ifdefvoid{#2}{}{\revsdnamepunct\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnamegiven{#2}\isdot}}
    {\usebibmacro{name:delim}{#1}%
     \usebibmacro{name:hook}{#1}%
     \mkbibnamefamily{#1}\isdot
     \ifdefvoid{#4}{}{\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnamesuffix{#4}\isdot}%
     \ifboolexpe{%
       test {\ifdefvoid{#2}}
       and
       test {\ifdefvoid{#3}}}
       {}
       {\revsdnamepunct}%
     \ifdefvoid{#2}{}{\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnamegiven{#2}\isdot}%
     \ifdefvoid{#3}{}{\bibnamedelimd\mkbibnameprefix{#3}\isdot}}}

\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@book{vanOostrom2013,
  langid    = {dutch},
  location  = {Amsterdam},
  title     = {Wereld in Woorden},
  publisher = {Uitgeverij Bert Bakker},
  date      = {2013},
  author    = {van Oostrom, Fritz},
  options   = {useprefix=true}
}
\end{filecontents*}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib}

\begin{document}
\begin{itemize}  
    \item \cite{vanOostrom2013}  is not what we want. the V must always be capitalized.
    \item luckily \cite{vanOostrom2013} will fix this for us
    \item same for \citeauthor{vanOostrom2013}, \citet{vanOostrom2013} and even \autocite{vanOostrom2013}
    \item but \fullcite{vanOostrom2013}
\end{itemize}

Sometimes, however, I want to quote \textcquote*{vanOostrom2013}{Some Famous words}.

\printbibliography
\end{document}

Van Oostrom 2013 is not what we want. the V must always be capitalized.//luckily Van Oostrom 2013 will fix this for us//same for Van Oostrom, Van Oostrom (2013) and even (Van Oostrom 2013)//but F. van Oostrom (2013). Wereld in Woorden. Amsterdam: Uitgeverij Bert Bakker

Note that the name order with inverted names in the bibliography does not seem to follow the conventions in the Netherlands (I would expect 'Oostrom, F. van', see https://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/145/). For that you would need How can I put a name's prefix in front in citations but *not* in the bibliography?. A related question is at Prefixes in author names in references and bibliography.

It is still advisable to use the capitalised form \Cite, \Parencite at the beginning of sentences since those commands may produce more text that might be subject to capitalisation (one real-world example is "ibid.").

  • thx @moewe for this elegant solution. Am I correct when I say I still "need" to use \Textcite (and equivalents) in the beginning of a sentence in order to easily change citationstyles (should the need ever arise) – LooselySubtle Dec 15 '18 at 7:58
  • 1
    @LooselySubtle Yes, using the capitalised version at the beginning of a sentence is still preferred in case the commands print other text that might have to adjust capitalisation, for example "ibid.". – moewe Dec 15 '18 at 10:52
3

Since there are apparently no circumstances in which you will not want the first letter capitalised, you should be able to reset the command used by csquotes generally:

\SetCiteCommand{\Parencite}

If you needed more fine-grained control you would need to replicate \textcquote with a variant that used a different cite command.

  • 1
    +1 For the clever workaround. As it turns out writing your own version of csquotes-like \...quote macros is not as easy as writing your own \...cite command (tex.stackexchange.com/q/463165/35864). – moewe Dec 14 '18 at 13:19
  • I can only vote one answer to be correct :/ - Sorry Paul but @moewes is a little bit more elegant... – LooselySubtle Dec 15 '18 at 7:59
  • I violently disagree: @moewe's is a lot more elegant! – Paul Stanley Dec 17 '18 at 9:40

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