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I am making the delta and star connections in circuitikz. But I have some problems stylizing ...

For the Star Connection:

\documentclass[border=3mm]{standalone}
\usepackage{circuitikz}
\begin{document}
\begin{circuitikz} \draw

(2.5,1.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-a1) {a}
(0,1) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-a2) {a}
(2.5,1) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-b1) {b}
(1.5,1) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-b2) {b}
(2.5,0) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-c1) {c}
(0.75,0) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-c2) {c}
(2.5,0.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-n1) {N}
(0.75,0.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-n2) {N}
(circ-c2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-n2)
(circ-n2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-b2)
(circ-n2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-a2)
(circ-b1) -- (circ-b2)
(circ-c1) -- (circ-c2)
(circ-n1) -- (circ-n2)
(circ-a1) -- ++ (-2.5,0) -- (circ-a2)

;\end{circuitikz}
\end{document}

enter image description here

And for the Delta:

\documentclass[border=3mm]{standalone}
\usepackage{circuitikz}
\begin{document}
\begin{circuitikz} \draw

(2.5,1.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-a1) {a}
(1,1.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-a2) {a}
(2.5,0.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-b1) {b}
(2,0.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-b2) {b}
(2.5,0) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-c1) {c}
(0,0.5) node[circ, scale=0.6] (circ-c2) {c}
(circ-b2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-a2)
(circ-c2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-a2)
(circ-c2) to[/tikz/circuitikz/bipoles/length=0.7cm, sV, scale=0.5] (circ-b2)
(circ-a1) -- (circ-a2)
(circ-b1) -- (circ-b2)
(circ-c1) -- ++ (-2.5,0) -- (circ-c2)
;\end{circuitikz}

\end{document}

enter image description here

I would like the Indices to be observable without changing the size of the nodes. And there are some lines I would like to remove. Also I want to know if there is a way to place the polarity in the voltage sources. Something similar to these images:

enter image description here

enter image description here

4

enter image description here

with tikz is simpler than with circuitikz

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{arrows}
\tikzset{
 sV/.style = {circle, draw, fill=white,
              minimum size=6mm, inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt,
              node contents={\Large$\sim$}},
dot/.style = {circle,fill, minimum size=2mm,
              inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt,
              node contents={}},
cir/.style = {circle,draw, fill=white, minimum size=2mm,
              inner sep=0pt, outer sep=0pt,
              node contents={}}
        }
\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}
\draw   (0,0) node (n) [dot,label={[text=red]above:n}]
              -- node [sV,label=right:$V_{cn}$] ++ (270:2)   node (c) [cir,label=below:$c$]
        (0,0) -- node [sV,label=above:$V_{bn}$] ++ ( 30:2)   node (b) [cir,label=above:$b$]
        (0,0) -- node [sV,label=above:$V_{an}$] ++ (150:2)   node (a) [cir,label= left:$a$];
\draw[-o]   (a) |- ++ (4.5,1)         node[right,text=red] (a')  {A};
\draw[-o]   (b)  -- (b -| a'.west)  node [right,text=red] {B};
\draw[-o]   (n)  -- (n -| a'.west)  node [right,text=red] {N};
\draw[-o]   (c)  -- (c -| a'.west)  node [right,text=red] {C};
    \end{tikzpicture}

\bigskip
    \begin{tikzpicture}
\draw   (0,0) -- node [sV] ++ (2,0)     node (b) [dot,label=below:b]
              -- node [sV] ++ (120:2)   node (c) [dot,label=above:c]
              -- node [sV] ++ (240:2)   node (a) [dot,label=below left:a];
\draw[-o]   (a) |- ++ (3,-1)   node[right] (a')  {a};
\draw[-o]   (b)  -- (b -| a'.west)  node [right] {b};
\draw[-o]   (c)  -- (c -| a'.west)  node [right] {c};
    \end{tikzpicture}

\end{document}

note: alternate voltage source hasn't polarity (as far as i know), consequently i omit signs + and -.

  • I agree with you. As far as I know, alternate voltage source doesn't have polarity. But I took those last images from a book called engineering circuit analysis. Why do they have polarity in the images? – Delfin Dec 16 '18 at 6:23
  • And also ... I liked the output using tikz ... But if it is simpler. What's the point of using circuitikz? – Delfin Dec 16 '18 at 6:25
  • 1
    @Delfin, circuitikz is very useful for drawing more demanding electronic scheme, for example see tex.stackexchange.com/questions/395535 :-) it works fine if elements are horizontally or vertically aligned (as show my experiences). and manuals: you should always use some logic in reading it ... they can contain errors – Zarko Dec 16 '18 at 6:58
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Here is a solution with circuitikz, which I really find easier than plain tikz (but that's a matter of personal preferences, and being one of the maintainers of circuitikz, I am biased).

The way I write circuits (with relative and interdependent coordinates) is for making them easily adjustable and reusable. Comments in the code will explain it.

\documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone}
\usepackage[siunitx]{circuitikz}
\begin{document}
\begin{circuitikz}[
    american]
    \path (0,0) coordinate(n) node[above,red]{$n$};
    % we want a star, let's use polar coordinates
    \draw(n) to[sV, v =$V_{cn}$, *-o] ++(-90:3) coordinate(c) node[left,red]{$c$};
    \draw(n) to[sV, v<=$V_{bn}$, *-o] ++(30:3)  coordinate(b) node[above,red]{$b$};
    \draw(n) to[sV, v<=$V_{an}$, *-o] ++(150:3) coordinate(a) node[left,red]{$a$};
    % leads; the first one determines the horizontal shift (coordinate hh)
    % just change the ++(5,0) here and all will move logically
    \draw (c) to[short, o-o] ++(5,0) coordinate(hh) node[red,right]{$C$};
    % now we use the syntax -| ( horizontal -| vertical) to draw the wires
    \draw (b) to[short, o-o] (b -| hh) node[red,right]{$B$};
    \draw (n) to[short, o-o] (n -| hh) node[red,right]{$N$};
    % a is a bit more complex, because it's not straight on
    \draw (a) to[short, o-] ++(0,1) coordinate(aa) % small vertical wire
          to[short,-o] (aa -| hh) node[red,right]{$A$};
\end{circuitikz}
\end{document}

beautiful star connected generatos :-)

Important notes about the circuit:

  1. you have to adjust the voltage directions by hand, but it's not difficult. There is a bit of long term discussion about it on the main site;
  2. try not to superimpose wires with no connections ([short]) with open connections ([short, o-]), it can be ugly (we could fill the circles, but I do not like that solution either);
  3. triangle-connection is left as an exercise for the studentreader.

Add about the circuit (electronics professor hat on): obviously the voltages are sinusoidal, but the do have polarity: when having for example two sources, it says when and if the are both positive - it conveys the all-important concept of relative phase. If you switch one generator in a system you change the sign of power --- from dissipating to generating. So signs are relevant.

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