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Hey @all (& a happy new year),

I am currently facing the challenge of including 3 languages and 2 different writing systems in one document. These are: German as main language, English as an additional language and Japanese as the third language. When it comes to Japanese, there are some additional requirements, however since I already fail at the basics, I will try to ask for everything in an order. 1) I noticed there is a package called "LuatexJa" which is supposed to help when it comes to mainly japanese documents. However, for me, the ratio will always be German > Japanese. I tried using it, but it kind of broke my formatting for the German text parts. 2) I would like to use a specific font (Yu Mincho Light), but since I didn't know how to apply it (I checked the LuatexJa" manual, but it didn't work for me using Overleaf), I stuck with the standard one for now

Here is an example (the text does not make sense semantically - it just serves as a visual example) :

Thank you so much in advance!

 \documentclass[12pt,a4paper,headings=standardclasses,numbers=noenddot]{scrreprt}
%\usepackage{showframe}
\usepackage[left=2.50cm, right=2.50cm, top=2.50cm, bottom=2.00cm]{geometry}
\usepackage[onehalfspacing]{setspace}
\usepackage[main=ngerman, english]{babel}
\usepackage[babel, german=quotes]{csquotes}
\usepackage[ngerman]{isodate}
\usepackage[ngerman]{datetime}
\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage{libertinust1math}
%   Alternative Times
%   \usepackage{times}
%   \fontfamily{ptm}\selectfont
\usepackage[yu-win10]{luatexja-fontspec}
\setmainfont{Linux Libertine O}
\setmainjfont{IPAexMincho}
\usepackage{luatexja-ruby}
%----------------------------------------------------------------------------
\begin{document}
\chapter*{Abstract}
Cho unterbreitet in dem Sammelband „Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture“, der 2017 von Kōichi \textsc{Iwabuchi} herausgegeben wurde, einen interessanten Vorschlag zum Verständnis der asiatischen Populärkultur. Diese fasst er als „Mélange of iterations“ auf und stellt damit der für ihn bislang nur westlich-zentrierten Forschung einen asiatischen Ursprung und Blickwinkel gegenüber. こんにちは、\ltjruby[]{皆|様}{みな|さま}!
\end{document}
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What I see is that the quotation marks are badly treated. Skimming in the documentation I found the following:

\documentclass[12pt,a4paper,headings=standardclasses,numbers=noenddot]{scrreprt}
%\usepackage{showframe}
\usepackage[left=2.50cm, right=2.50cm, top=2.50cm, bottom=2.00cm]{geometry}
\usepackage[onehalfspacing]{setspace}
\usepackage[main=ngerman, english]{babel}
\usepackage[babel, german=quotes]{csquotes}
\usepackage[ngerman]{isodate}
\usepackage[ngerman]{datetime}
\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage{libertinust1math}

\usepackage{luatexja}
\usepackage[yu-win10]{luatexja-fontspec}
\usepackage{luatexja-ruby}

\setmainfont{Linux Libertine O}
\setmainjfont{IPAexMincho}

\ltjsetparameter{jacharrange={-3}} % <--- punctuation is Latin

\begin{document}

\chapter*{Abstract}

Cho unterbreitet in dem Sammelband „\foreignlanguage{english}{Routledge 
Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture}“, der 2017 von 
Kōichi \textsc{Iwabuchi} herausgegeben wurde, einen interessanten 
Vorschlag zum Verständnis der asiatischen Populärkultur. Diese fasst er 
als „\foreignlanguage{english}{Mélange of iterations}“ auf und stellt 
damit der für ihn bislang nur westlich-zentrierten Forschung einen 
asiatischen Ursprung und Blickwinkel gegenüber. 
こんにちは、\ltjruby[]{皆|様}{みな|さま}!

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • thank you very much! does that apply to all kinds of symbols? (does it mean I should be inserting \foreignlanguage{english} in all kinds of symbols like comma, colon, period, e.g.? and could you help me concerning the font issue? I've tried several spellings for Yu Mincho Regular but none of them worked for me. Do you happen to know if this might be due to Overleaf? – user168390 Jan 12 at 14:47
  • @user168390 \foreignlanguage is for short inserts in a language different from the current one. I don't know how you can use fonts on Overleaf if their system doesn't have them. – egreg Jan 12 at 14:50
  • thank you! I am just wondering if I am approaching it correctly, as the less used (and therefore "foreign") language would probably be Japanese for me, while German should apply for most of the document. But I might misunderstand the wording and functioning there. – user168390 Jan 12 at 15:17

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