4

This question already has an answer here:

The following works to give the title all in black:

\title{The Title}

But this does not work to make the first word in the title red:

\title{{\color{red}The} Title}

How does one make just one word in the title a different color?

marked as duplicate by Werner, user121799, Phelype Oleinik, Stefan Pinnow, flav Jan 15 at 7:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • \textcolor{red}{The} should work in a standard class. – Bernard Jan 14 at 23:53
  • Thanks for the suggestion, but it does not work either. Could the problem be my use of \documentclass ? – Michael B. Heaney Jan 14 at 23:56
  • Well, you should post a minimal non-working example code. – Bernard Jan 14 at 23:58
  • Thanks for your helpful advice. Here is a minimal non-working example code: \documentclass[11pt]{amsart} \usepackage{color} \title{The title} \begin{document} \maketitle \end{document} – Michael B. Heaney Jan 15 at 0:08
4

The \title under amsart is set in CAPITAL LETTERS. As such, merely using

\title{\textcolor{red}{The} title}

doesn't work out-of-the-box because there is no colour RED. However, it's simple enough to define RED to be the same as red:

enter image description here

\documentclass{amsart}

\usepackage{xcolor}

\colorlet{RED}{red}
\title{\textcolor{red}{The} title}
\author{An Author}

\begin{document}

\maketitle

\end{document}
5

With amsart there is the problem of capitalization, but it is easily solved.

\documentclass{amsart}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\usepackage{textcase}

\DeclareRobustCommand{\foo}[1]{\textcolor{red}{#1}}

\begin{document}

\title[The title]{\foo{The} title}
\author{An Author}

\maketitle

\end{document}

Use a more meaningful name than \foo, of course. Omit the optional argument if you also want the coloring in the page headings.

See https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/468247/4427 for details about why loading textcase is better for the application.

The rationale for defining a command is that hardwiring a color means having to chase for every occurrence in the document for it, whereas with a command you can just modify the definition in case you change your mind about what color to use (or no color at all).

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