3

Assuming in a presentation first a large and relatively complicated tikzpicture is shown. After this overview, the focus should be set to two small parts of the graph and next to it, there should be a ennumeration, describing the relevance of these two subprocesses. I've tried the following using the spy tikzlibrary:

\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{spy}

\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}[spy using outlines={rectangle, magnification=5, size=2cm, connect spies}]
    \def\corxb{0}
    \def\coryb{0}
    %firstly defining the start variables so the object can be positioned      relatively to another object.
    %fill the tank with water
    \fill[top color=blue!90!,bottom color=blue!2,middle color=blue!30,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb,\coryb+4) circle (2cm and 0.5cm);
    \fill[left color=gray!50!blue,right color=blue!50!black,middle color=gray!50,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb+2,\coryb) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) arc (360:180:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);      
    %draw densely dashed lines for the "hidden" lines
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+0) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    %draw the outline
    \draw (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) ++ (\corxb-4,\coryb);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);

    \spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (-1.5,0)  in node at (-2,-2);
    \spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (1.5,0) in node at (2,-2);
    \end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

This is fine as it is, but it doesn't allow to add bullet points to describe the graph. Therefore, I want to display only the magnified part, while having the enumeration as described above (the enumeration is not directly related to this question, however, I thought I'll leave it in to describe my intentions):

enter image description here

Additional clarification: i only need the magnified part, there is no need for the rest of the graph to be displayed.

A possiblity seems to be to just clip the picture, but i think it's quite impractical to do especially if you're working with large graph that have different elements and you don't know exactly where a certain node is located exactly e.g. in the case of (nodeX.south).

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{spy}

\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}[spy using outlines={rectangle, magnification=5, size=2cm, connect spies}]
    \path[clip] (-2.25,-1) rectangle (0,0.75);
    \draw[red, thick, dashed] (-2.25,-1) rectangle (0,0.75);
    %
    \def\corxb{0}
    \def\coryb{0}
    %firstly defining the start variables so the object can be positioned      relatively to another object.
    %fill the tank with water
    \fill[top color=blue!90!,bottom color=blue!2,middle color=blue!30,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb,\coryb+4) circle (2cm and 0.5cm);
    \fill[left color=gray!50!blue,right color=blue!50!black,middle color=gray!50,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb+2,\coryb) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) arc (360:180:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);      
    %draw densely dashed lines for the "hidden" lines
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+0) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    %draw the outline
    \draw (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) ++ (\corxb-4,\coryb);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);

    %\spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (-1.5,0)  in node at (-2,-2);
    \end{tikzpicture}
\end{document} 

1 Answer 1

3

You mean something like this:

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{spy}


\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}[spy using outlines={rectangle, magnification=5, size=2cm, connect spies}]
    \def\corxb{0}
    \def\coryb{0}
    %firstly defining the start variables so the object can be positioned      relatively to another object.
    %fill the tank with water
    \fill[top color=blue!90!,bottom color=blue!2,middle color=blue!30,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb,\coryb+4) circle (2cm and 0.5cm);
    \fill[left color=gray!50!blue,right color=blue!50!black,middle color=gray!50,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb+2,\coryb) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) arc (360:180:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);      
    %draw densely dashed lines for the "hidden" lines
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+0) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    %draw the outline
    \draw (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) ++ (\corxb-4,\coryb);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);

    \spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (-1.5,0)  in node at (-2,-2);

    \draw (0, -1.3) node[text width=3cm, text height = 1cm] {
        \begin{itemize}
        \item[] M1
        \item[] M2
        \item[] M3
        \end{itemize}
    };
    \end{tikzpicture}
\end{document} 

to get:

enter image description here

Note that I just removed another panned out view just for avoiding redundancy.

Update 1: I have removed most of the parts of the plots as the OP wanted. However, the part that OP wants to remove remain unaffected. May be there is better way to achieve that.

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{spy}


\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}[spy using outlines={rectangle, magnification=5, size=2cm}]
    \def\corxb{0}
    \def\coryb{0}
    %firstly defining the start variables so the object can be positioned      relatively to another object.
    %fill the tank with water
    \fill[top color=blue!90!,bottom color=blue!2,middle color=blue!30,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb,\coryb+4) circle (2cm and 0.5cm);
    \fill[left color=gray!50!blue,right color=blue!50!black,middle color=gray!50,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb+2,\coryb) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) arc (360:180:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);      
    %draw densely dashed lines for the "hidden" lines
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+0) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    %draw the outline
    \draw (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) ++ (\corxb-4,\coryb);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);

    \spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (-1.5,0)  in node at (-2,-2);

    \draw (0, -1.3) node[text width=3cm, text height = 1cm] {
        \begin{itemize}
        \item[] M1
        \item[] M2
        \item[] M3
        \end{itemize}
    };
\pgfresetboundingbox
\path[use as bounding box, draw=none] (-3,-3) rectangle (0,-1);
    \end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

which would give you:

enter image description here

Here I reset the bounding box to achieve this much. However, I believe with overlay much more can be achieved.

Update 2: Now achieved without the usage of spy. Considering the OP only needs a part of the figure to be displayed, usage of spy doesn't make much sense per se.

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{tikz}


\begin{document}
    \begin{tikzpicture}
    \def\corxb{0}
    \def\coryb{0}
    %firstly defining the start variables so the object can be positioned      relatively to another object.
    %fill the tank with water
    \fill[top color=blue!90!,bottom color=blue!2,middle color=blue!30,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb,\coryb+4) circle (2cm and 0.5cm);
    \fill[left color=gray!50!blue,right color=blue!50!black,middle color=gray!50,shading=axis,opacity=0.15] (\corxb+2,\coryb) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) arc (360:180:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);      
    %draw densely dashed lines for the "hidden" lines
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+0) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:0:2cm and 0.5cm);
    %draw the outline
    \draw (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) -- (\corxb-2,\coryb) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm) -- (\corxb+2,\coryb+4) ++ (\corxb-4,\coryb);
    \draw[] (\corxb-2,\coryb+4) arc (180:360:2cm and 0.5cm);
    % you really don't need it if you only want to display a part of the whole
%   \spy [red,dashed, magnification=1.8] on (-1.5,0)  in node at (-2,-2);
\draw[red, dashed] (-2.05,-0.55) rectangle (-.95,0.55);
\draw[fill=white, draw=none] (-.95,0.55) rectangle (.15,-0.55);
    \draw (1, 0.2) node[text width=5cm, text height = 1cm] {
    \begin{itemize}
    \item[] M1
    \item[] M2
    \item[] M3
    \end{itemize}
};
%\draw[fill=red, draw=none] (-2.05,0.55) rectangle (.15,-1.45);
\pgfresetboundingbox
    \path[use as bounding box, draw=none] (-2.05,0.55) rectangle (.15,-1.45);
    \end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

this will give

enter image description here

This is done by hard-coding the bounding box atop the desired area.

11
  • Yes, but only the square (displaying the magnification) + the enumeration should be displayed, the rest of the graph isn't needed anymore.
    – Octopus
    Jan 28, 2019 at 14:06
  • 2
    spy is a library and described in the pgfmanual.
    – user121799
    Jan 28, 2019 at 14:08
  • @Octopus May be off-topic then without something what do you want to magnify? In my understanding, spy is used to magnify something that is present ;) If there is a way (which I do believe that there might be one or many), I leave it to our Tikzperts. And my suggestion would be then be to only draw the panned version :) Jan 28, 2019 at 14:21
  • 2
    It might be possible to do something using e.g. these methods. That is, spy stores the contents of the magnified pieces in some boxes. I just do not know all the box commands used there. If you happen to be familiar with the \copy and so on commands, you may just copy the relevant box in some macro and recycle it.
    – user121799
    Jan 28, 2019 at 15:29
  • Thanks again Raaja, i like the clipping approach, however, i think it's hard to define and quite impractical if you have a large graph
    – Octopus
    Jan 28, 2019 at 15:35

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