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I recently noticed that when using the \usepackage{comicsans} package in Windows 10, by default, all characters turn into squares. After a bit research, it was due to the fact that COMIC.ttf is no longer supported(included) in windows system????

A bit of shocking news. But then I manually downloaded and installed the font. However, when I use \textbf{text}, the characters wrapped inside still cannot be displayed correctly, as shown below.

Is there a way to solve it once for all?

Thanks.

enter image description here

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article}

\usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts}
\usepackage{comicsans}
%\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
%\usepackage[math]{iwona} %nice font
\usepackage[top=1cm,bottom=2cm,left=1cm,right=1cm]{geometry}

\usepackage{enumerate}
\usepackage{lastpage}
\usepackage{fancyhdr}
\pagestyle{fancy}
\fancyhf{} % clears the header and footer
%\fancyhead[C]{\textbf{FE5116}}
\fancyfoot[L]{Page \thepage\ of \pageref{LastPage}}

\renewcommand{\headrulewidth}{0pt}

\begin{document}

\begin{center}
\textbf{Equation of a straight line}
\end{center}

\begin{minipage}[t]{0.55\textwidth}

In mathematics we are almost obsessed with finding the equations of straight lines. There are different ways of doing this, but the best way is to use the equation:
\[
    y-y_1 = m(x-x_1),
\]
where $m$ is the gradient of the line and $(x_1,y_1)$ is the coordinates of a point on the line. \\

So, using this equation, find the equation of the following lines, giving your answer in the form
\[
    ax+by+c = 0,
\]
where $a,b,c$ are integers (whole numbers -- no fractions).
\end{minipage}
%
\begin{minipage}[t]{0.4\textwidth}
%
\end{minipage}



%% new command %%
\newcommand*{\myQues}[1]{%
\item #1 \\
    \vfill
    \hfill $\rule{6cm}{0.3mm}$ \quad (3)
}%

\begin{enumerate}[1)]
    \myQues{The line with gradient $4$ that passes through $(1,3)$.}
    \myQues{The line with gradient $2$ that passes through $(6,2)$.}
    \cleardoublepage
    \myQues{The line with gradient $1$ that passes through $(2,-3)$.}
    \myQues{The line with gradient $10$ that passes through $(-4,-6)$.}
    \cleardoublepage
    \myQues{The line with gradient $-2$ that passes through $(4,1)$.}
    \myQues{The line with gradient $-3$ that passes through $(-2,-5)$.}
\end{enumerate}

%\end{document}


\cleardoublepage
Now, what happens if the gradient is a fraction? We still want our final answer to consist of integers -- so no fractions \ldots

\begin{enumerate}[1)]
\setcounter{enumi}{6}
\myQues{The line with gradient $\frac{1}{2}$ that passes through $(5,2)$.}
\myQues{The line with gradient $\frac{2}{3}$ that passes through $(6,1)$.}
\cleardoublepage
\myQues{The line with gradient $\frac{3}{4}$ that passes through $(2,-2)$.}
\myQues{The line with gradient $-\frac{1}{5}$ that passes through $(-2,4)$.}
\cleardoublepage
\myQues{The line with gradient $3$ that passes through $(\frac{1}{3},4)$.}
\myQues{The line with gradient $-2$ that passes through $(-\frac{1}{4},-\frac{2}{9})$.}
\end{enumerate}

\end{document}
  • Did you also install Comic Sans Bold? – Davislor Feb 2 '19 at 4:36
  • @Davislor No, I did not. Honestly I did not expect such a problem (from MS). I don't see any point of removing a font and WHY? It's also not easy to find/download from the internet. I spend 10 minutes looking for it. What's the file name for the Bold font? Or do you know a place I can download them from? Thanks. – CasperYC Feb 2 '19 at 4:53
  • The list of filenames is here. It should be included with Windows 10. Try loading it with fontspec. – Davislor Feb 2 '19 at 4:56
  • On an OS other than Windows or OS X, or if for some reason they’re missing (check with fc-list), you can download an older version using MS Core Fonts for the Web. – Davislor Feb 2 '19 at 4:59
  • @Davislor Weirdly, I don't think they are! It's not the first time I realised it. I had problems in both Win10 1083 and 1809 versions. – CasperYC Feb 2 '19 at 5:00
0

Thanks to UlrikeFischer, I’ve removed an inaccurate paragraph here. The package is out-of-date and incompatible with recent versions of Comic Sans MS.

You can try replacing the comicsans package with fontspec:

\usepackage{fontspec}
\defaultfontfeatures{Scale = MatchUppercase}
\setmainfont{Comic Sans MS}[Scale = 1.0]

If you also want to replace the math letters, you might load mathastext afterwards, or

\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{XITS Math}
\setmathfont[range = up]{Comic Sans MS}
\setmathfont[range = it]{Comic Sans MS Italic}
\setmathfont[range = bfup]{Comic Sans MS Bold}
\setmathfont[range = bfit]{Comic Sans MS Bold Italic}

According to Microsoft, Comic Sans MS is in fact included with Windows 10.

You can legally obtain the older version of that’s compatible with comicsans gratis as part of the redistributable Microsoft Core Fonts for the Web.

| improve this answer | |
  • Is there a way to do this with pdflatex? I don't think pdflatex work with fontspec. – CasperYC Feb 2 '19 at 5:12
  • Btw, before I downloaded comic.ttf, the PDF was displayed as squares only. And when I was installing the file for the very first time, windows did not show any warning of replacing an existing font. So it must be a BUG for Windows 10. – CasperYC Feb 2 '19 at 5:14
  • If you’re using PDFLaTeX, you will need to regenerate Type 1 versions of the fonts according to the instructions in the package manual. Repeat them now that your bold font is installed. – Davislor Feb 2 '19 at 5:19
  • The comicsans package uses the ttf-font directly. A conversion to type1 is only needed for the optional italic and cyrilic variants. But the encoding files of comicsans seems not be compatible with the ttf anymore - probably the font changed. One should inform the author of the package, he needs to adapt it. – Ulrike Fischer Feb 2 '19 at 10:05
  • @UlrikeFischer Ah. The font has indeed changed over the years. – Davislor Feb 2 '19 at 10:08

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