2

I have an article , the whole bunch is written as

\documentclass[12pt,english]{article}
%\usepackage[margin=2in]{geometry}  %use this later of you need tp specfy margin
%\usepackage{microtype} % might not be helpful
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{comment}
\excludecomment{comment}
%\includecomment{comment}
%\usepackage{subfigmat}
\usepackage{graphicx} % for grapghics
%\usepackage{subfig}
%\usepackage{subfigmat}
\usepackage{caption}  % Enable figure captions or figure notes
\usepackage{subcaption} %Further enable subcaptions
\usepackage{booktabs} %for table
\usepackage{amsmath} %for equations and mathematical symbols
\usepackage{amssymb} 
\usepackage{rotating} %for table rotation
\usepackage{lscape}
\usepackage{float} % allow tables to self adjust
\usepackage{morefloats}
%\usepackage{booktabs,caption,fixltx2e}
\usepackage[flushleft]{threeparttable}
\usepackage{tabularx}
\usepackage{adjustbox}
\usepackage{hyperref} % allow hyper referencing
\usepackage{breakcites}
\usepackage{csquotes}
\usepackage{enumerate} % to get all that enumeration offers
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{booktabs, ltablex}
\keepXColumns

\newcommand\mc[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}
\usepackage{pdflscape}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\usepackage{xcolor} % for font coloring
\usepackage{blindtext}
\captionsetup{font=footnotesize}
\usepackage[round]{natbib}
\bibliographystyle{plainnat}
\begin{document}

\section{Introduction}

\bigskip The multiple crises of the last two decades provide an ideal testing ground for measuring techniques of the systemic risks facing global equity markets. Understanding systemic risks with empirical tests on contagion, spillovers and financial networks has been a long standing research question. While the literature stretches back as early as \citet{King:1990} on spillovers and \citet{AllenGale1998} on contagion, the empirical literature on networks and financial spillovers is more recent. \citet{Allen:2000} and....

In between the article I have this section

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{booktabs, ltablex}
\keepXColumns
\newcommand\mc[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}

\usepackage{pdflscape}
\usepackage{enumitem}

\begin{document}

\begin{landscape}
    \small
\setlist[enumerate]{nosep,
                    wide,
                    label=\textbf{\arabic*}.,
                    before = \vspace{-\baselineskip},
                    after  = \vspace{-\baselineskip}
                    }
    \setlength\tabcolsep{3pt}
    \begin{tabularx}{\linewidth}{@{}lXXX@{}}
\caption{Empirical Analysis comparing DY, GHD, SVS}
\label{tab1}
    \\  \toprule
\multicolumn{4}{c}{Transmission}
    \\ \midrule
\mc{Blocks} &   \mc{DY} &   \mc{GHD}    & \mc{GHD-SVD}
    \\
\endfirsthead
\caption*{Table~\thetable: Empirical Analysis comparing DY, GHD, SVS}
\label{tab1}    \\
    \toprule
\multicolumn{4}{c}{Transmission}
    \\ \midrule
\mc{Blocks} &   \mc{DY} &   \mc{GHD}    & \mc{GHD-SVD}
    \\
\endhead
    \midrule
\multicolumn{4}{r}{\textit{continue on the next page}}
\endfoot
    \bottomrule
\endlastfoot
AC  &   \begin{enumerate}
    \item   Transmission mounts for India, Singapore and Thailand facing GFC.
    \item   South Korean transmissions amplify during 2002-2004, when then global economy was riddled with many crises.
    \item   Malaysia and the Philippines markets demonstrates neutral to dampening transmissions all around.
    \item   Inclusion of oil and commodity indices amplifies transmission during crisis, only for India and South Korea.
    \item   Little amplification in transmission is observed for all participants facincg GFC.
    \end{enumerate}
        &   \begin{enumerate}
        \item   Patterns accord well with DY results for India, Singapore and Thailand during 2006-2008 GFC period.
        \item   As opposed to DY depiction, South Korean transmission bears negetive sign suggesting, dampening of transmission is dominant during 2002-2004.
        \item   The Philippines and South Korea portrays negative transmissions , with the only exception during the GFC event. This supports DY argument.
        \item   Positive transmissions are plotted for all markets during GFC, similar to the DY observations
            \end{enumerate}
            &   Transmissions in the AC cluster evince  effects of contagion swaying the markets.
    \\  \addlinespace
EC  &   \begin{enumerate}
    \item   We find a resurgence in transmission for Germany during 2002-2004  similar to that of South Korea mentioned earlier.
    \item   France and UK transmissions amplify in the advent of Eurozone crisis, while remaining neutral in th earlier crises.
    \item   Australian transmissions slightly amplify during GFC and  during Export crisis. Dampening prevails in the transitions between crises.
    \item   Chinese transmissions amplify mostly with the recent Chinese crisis. Earlier, Chinese transmissions amplified only during GFC.
        \end{enumerate}
        &   \begin{enumerate}
        \item   Again,  with Germany we find negative transmissions across 2002-2004, rejecting DY depiction.
        \item   Consistent with DY, GHD shows positive transmission across Eurozone crisis, preceded by a negative dampening during GFC for both France and UK.
        \item   GHD is consistent with DY for Australia .
        \item   The findings are in accord with DY.
            \end{enumerate}
            &   \begin{enumerate}
            \item   Results remain consistent with GHD, with contagion prevailing for Germany, France, UK markets.
            \item   Short-lived volatility rises profoundly for Australia and China corresponding to major events. This explains Australian and Chinese transmissions are driven predominantly .
                \end{enumerate}
    \\  \addlinespace
GC  &   \begin{enumerate}
    \item   Transmissions amplify for Greece, Portugal and Ireland with the Eurozone crisis /GC. Recently, Ireland transmissions ascend following a descend.
    \item   Belgium shows escalating transmissions facing the recent export shrinkage.
        \end{enumerate}
        &   \begin{enumerate}
        \item   Greek transmission evinces small surges in the positive direction, followed by strong negative dampening.
        \item   Belgium transmissions remain neutral to dampening. Unlike DY, the positive and negative estimates offset strong amplifications for Belgium.
        \item   As the Greek crisis unfolds, positive transmissions resurge for Croatia. This is not identified with DY.
            \end{enumerate}
    \\  \addlinespace
OED &   \begin{enumerate}
    \item   We find the strongest transmissions for the USA and Japan during dot comm bubble. studies in this tenet, is dismissed with GHD.
    \item    Russian transmissions amplify in all major events across the sample periods, leading to a phenomenal jump facing the recent Russian financial crisis of 2014-2015. Inclusion of oil and commodity indices slightly dampen the transmissions.
    \item   The transmissions for both Canada and Norway  sharply descends corresponding to
    \item   Gyrations in the transmissions of New Zealand do not show sharp oscillations.
        \end{enumerate}
        &   \begin{enumerate}
        \item   Of all the markets presented in this block, high volatility in transmissions holds sway over Japan and New Zealand only. Crucially, this explains `conduit' transmissions for Japan, s are volatility driven simply due to its high  susceptibility to developed markets and oil shocks.
        \item   Risk transmission from Russia remains strongly positive for the most part, with exceptions only during the advent of GFC and Russian Crisis 2014-2015.
        \item   The patterns accord well with the DY findings for both Canada and Norway. Additionally, ...
        \item   For the most part, the transmissions that New Zealand emit is near to its mean, ...
        \end{enumerate}
            &
    \\
    \end{tabularx}

As you can see, if I insert the table in the article, with default font size, the table is fine. But If i include the table when article fontsize is \documentclass[12pt,english]{article}, the increased size distorts the table. I need to ensure fontsize is set to 12 pt and not less.How can I reduce the font size for everything under \begin{landscape} how to do that? In a nutshell, I want the table to have default font size, but the article wrapping the table to have 12 pt font size.

  • 2
    (i) well, it seems that this question is follow-up question to tex.stackexchange.com/questions/470610/cant-read-my-table, where you select different solution as you present here. why you not use there accepted answer? (ii) if you look carefully the table, you will see, that it already use font size \small. if this size is still to big, just select next smaller font size (\footnotesize, for example) and see if than is table looks satisfactory. (iii) for help please merge your code fragmnet and showed mwe in one document. – Zarko Feb 13 at 4:08
  • to contionue, (iv) you had not nested article inside article. this cause error. actually, i don't understand what is your really problem. – Zarko Feb 13 at 4:14
  • you can only have one \documentclass command in the whole document so your question is not at all clear, also you have posted two disconnected fragments which makes it hard for anyone to debug your problem. Please edit the question so it just has a single but complete document example that generates the error that you are asking about. – David Carlisle Feb 13 at 7:59
  • If I understand at all you want to start the document \documentclass[12pt]{article} so the main text is 12pt then use \begin{table}\small \begin{tabular}.... to get a table at 10pt. – David Carlisle Feb 13 at 8:00
2

If you wish to have a setup in which you can compile either a complete document or just one table at a time, it's best to (a) place most or all of the preamble material in external files with extension .tex, to be loaded with \input statements, and (b) place the table-related material in an external file as well.

For instance, the main tex file might be as sparse as this:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\input MainPreamble
\input TablePreamble
\begin{document}
\input WideTable
\end{document}

The three files MainPreamble.tex, TablePreamble.tex, and WideTable.tex are defined below.

Observe that while the driver file specifies the document class option 12pt, the file WideTable.tex features \footnotesize near the top. The resulting roughly 20% linear reduction in the font size, from 12pt to 10pt, suffices to make the table fit within two pages.

Note that the hyperref package should be loaded last.

You'll also notice that I applied some changes to the table, e.g., to give the headers more structure and to make material in the columns more readable by switching from full justification to a ragged-right layout. And, do make a habit of using en-dashes to connect numbers. E.g., don't write 2002-2004; instead, please write 2002--2004. Your readers will almost certainly appreciate this touch of "high typography". :-)

enter image description here

\RequirePackage{filecontents}

\begin{filecontents*}{MainPreamble.tex}
%\usepackage{microtype} % might not be helpful
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{comment}
\excludecomment{comment}
\usepackage{graphicx} % for graphics
\usepackage{caption}  % Enable figure captions or figure notes
\usepackage{subcaption} %Further enable subcaptions
\usepackage{amsmath} %for equations and mathematical symbols
\usepackage{amssymb} 
\usepackage{rotating} %for table rotation
\usepackage{lscape}
\usepackage{float} % allow tables to self adjust (huh?!)
\usepackage{morefloats}
\usepackage[flushleft]{threeparttable}
\usepackage{tabularx}
\usepackage{adjustbox}
\usepackage{breakcites}
\usepackage{csquotes}
%\usepackage{enumerate} % don't load both 'enumerate' and 'enumitem'
\usepackage{geometry}
\usepackage{booktabs, ltablex}
\keepXColumns

\newcommand\mc[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}
\usepackage{pdflscape}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\usepackage{xcolor} 
\usepackage{blindtext}
%%\captionsetup{font=footnotesize}
\usepackage[round]{natbib}
\bibliographystyle{plainnat}
\usepackage{hyperref} % <-- load this package *last*
\end{filecontents*}


\begin{filecontents*}{TablePreamble.tex}
\usepackage{geometry} 
\geometry{letterpaper,margin=1in}% set suitable parameters
\usepackage{booktabs,ltablex,ragged2e}
\newcolumntype{L}{>{\RaggedRight\arraybackslash}X}
\keepXColumns
\providecommand\mc[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}

\usepackage{pdflscape,caption,tabularx,enumitem}
\setlist[enumerate]{nosep, wide,
                    label=\textbf{\arabic*}.,
                    before = \vspace{-\baselineskip},
                    after  = \vspace{-\baselineskip}
                    }
\end{filecontents*}


\begin{filecontents*}{WideTable.tex}
\begin{landscape}
\captionsetup{font=footnotesize}
\footnotesize % <-- new (20% linear reduction in font size)
\setlength\tabcolsep{3pt} % default: 6pt

\noindent
\begin{tabularx}{\linewidth}{@{} lLLL @{}}

%% headers and footers 

\caption{Empirical Analysis comparing DY, GHD, SVS}
\label{tab1}\\  
\toprule
Blocks & \multicolumn{3}{c@{}}{Transmission} \\ 
\cmidrule(l){2-4}
& \mc{DY} & \mc{GHD} & \mc{GHD-SVD} \\
\midrule
\endfirsthead

\caption*{Table~\thetable: Empirical Analysis comparing DY, GHD, SVS}\\
\multicolumn{4}{@{}l}{\textit{Continued from previous page}}\\
\addlinespace
\toprule
Blocks & \multicolumn{3}{c@{}}{Transmission}\\ 
\cmidrule(l){2-4}
& \mc{DY} & \mc{GHD} & \mc{GHD-SVD} \\
\midrule
\endhead

\midrule
\multicolumn{4}{r@{}}{\textit{Continued on next page}}
\endfoot

\bottomrule
\endlastfoot

%% body of table

AC  &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Transmission mounts for India, Singapore and Thailand facing GFC.
    \item South Korean transmissions amplify during 2002--2004, when then global economy was riddled with many crises.
    \item Malaysia and the Philippines markets demonstrates neutral to dampening transmissions all around.
    \item Inclusion of oil and commodity indices amplifies transmission during crisis, only for India and South Korea.
    \item Little amplification in transmission is observed for all participants facing GFC.
    \end{enumerate}
    &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Patterns accord well with DY results for India, Singapore and Thailand during 2006--2008 GFC period.
    \item As opposed to DY depiction, South Korean transmission bears negetive sign suggesting, dampening of transmission is dominant during 2002--2004.
    \item The Philippines and South Korea portrays negative transmissions, with the only exception during the GFC event. This supports DY argument.
    \item Positive transmissions are plotted for all markets during GFC, similar to the DY observations
    \end{enumerate}
    & Transmissions in the AC cluster evince  effects of contagion swaying the markets.
    \\  
\addlinespace
EC  &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item We find a resurgence in transmission for Germany during 2002--2004 similar to that of South Korea mentioned earlier.
    \item France and UK transmissions amplify in the advent of Eurozone crisis, while remaining neutral in th earlier crises.
    \item Australian transmissions slightly amplify during GFC and  during Export crisis. Dampening prevails in the transitions between crises.
    \item Chinese transmissions amplify mostly with the recent Chinese crisis. Earlier, Chinese transmissions amplified only during GFC.
    \end{enumerate}
    &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Again, with Germany we find negative transmissions across 2002--2004, rejecting DY depiction.
    \item Consistent with DY, GHD shows positive transmission across Eurozone crisis, preceded by a negative dampening during GFC for both France and UK.
    \item GHD is consistent with DY for Australia.
    \item The findings are in accord with DY.
    \end{enumerate}  
    &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Results remain consistent with GHD, with contagion prevailing for Germany, France, UK markets.
    \item Short-lived volatility rises profoundly for Australia and China corresponding to major events. This explains Australian and Chinese transmissions are driven predominantly \dots
    \end{enumerate}
    \\  
\addlinespace
GC  &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Transmissions amplify for Greece, Portugal and Ireland with the Eurozone crisis /GC. Recently, Ireland transmissions ascend following a descend.
    \item Belgium shows escalating transmissions facing the recent export shrinkage.
    \end{enumerate}
    &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Greek transmission evinces small surges in the positive direction, followed by strong negative dampening.
    \item Belgium transmissions remain neutral to dampening. Unlike DY, the positive and negative estimates offset strong amplifications for Belgium.
    \item As the Greek crisis unfolds, positive transmissions resurge for Croatia. This is not identified with DY.
    \end{enumerate}
    \\  
\addlinespace
OED &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item We find the strongest transmissions for the USA and Japan during dot comm bubble. studies in this tenet, is dismissed with GHD.
    \item Russian transmissions amplify in all major events across the sample periods, leading to a phenomenal jump facing the recent Russian financial crisis of 2014--2015. Inclusion of oil and commodity indices slightly dampen the transmissions.
    \item The transmissions for both Canada and Norway  sharply descends corresponding to
    \item Gyrations in the transmissions of New Zealand do not show sharp oscillations.
    \end{enumerate}
    &   
    \begin{enumerate}
    \item Of all the markets presented in this block, high volatility in transmissions holds sway over Japan and New Zealand only. Crucially, this explains `conduit' transmissions for Japan, s are volatility driven simply due to its high  susceptibility to developed markets and oil shocks.
    \item Risk transmission from Russia remains strongly positive for the most part, with exceptions only during the advent of GFC and Russian Crisis 2014--2015.
    \item The patterns accord well with the DY findings for both Canada and Norway. Additionally, \dots
    \item For the most part, the transmissions that New Zealand emit is near to its mean, \dots
    \end{enumerate}
    &
\\
\end{tabularx} 
\end{landscape} 
\end{filecontents*}

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