6

I want to write this equation in LaTeX:

q1 = (Number of women who had their second birth in 1971) / ((Number of women who had their first birth in 1970) - (Number of women who had their second birth in 1970))

This my LaTeX code for the equation:

\begin{equation} \nonumber
 q^*_1  =\frac{\text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971}}{\text{number of women who had their first birth in 1970 \textbf{-} number of women had their second birth in 1970}}
  \end {equation}

How can write the denominator as given in the picture?

8

A simple way is to use array for the denominator

\begin{equation} \nonumber
 q^*_1  =\frac{\text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971}}{
 \begin{array}{c}
   \text{number of women who had}\\
    \text{their first birth in 1970} 
 \end{array}
 -
 \begin{array}{c}
   \text{number of women who had}\\
    \text{their second birth in 1970} 
 \end{array}
 }
  \end{equation}  
  • 5
    @statistician, there is a green check-mark-style button next to the question. And while seems that you tested/prefer/like this answer... you should click this button to accept the answer and to not leave your question be shown as a question that didn't found a good enough answer. – koleygr Mar 15 at 20:24
7

I'd define a suitable notation, avoiding long verbal descriptions. I also added the verbose version, but adding parentheses for clarity.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

Let's denote by $W(n,y)$ the number of women who had their $n$th~birth
in the year~$y$. Then
\begin{equation*}
q^*_1 = \frac{W(2,1971)}{W(1,1970)-W(2,1970)}
\end{equation*}
We can also typeset this with words, but it comes out quite awful
unless we add parentheses
\begin{equation*}
q^*_1 =
\frac{
  \text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971}
}{
  \Bigl(
  \begin{tabular}{c}
  number of women who had \\
  their first birth in 1970
  \end{tabular}
  \Bigr)
  -
  \Bigl(
  \begin{tabular}{c}
  number of women who had \\
  their second birth in 1970
  \end{tabular}
  \Bigr)
}
\end{equation*}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Using equation* avoids the need for \nonumber.

  • 3
    +1. That said, I prefer the verbose version unless you need the values of $W$ often elsewhere. (Differing with @egreg is rare on $\TeX$ SE.) – Ethan Bolker Mar 16 at 12:37
6

An approach with parbox

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}


\begin{equation} \nonumber
 q^*_1  =\frac{\text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971}}{\text{\parbox{4.5cm}{\centering number of women who had their first birth in 1970}} - \text{\parbox{4cm}{\centering number of women had their second birth in 1970}}}
  \end {equation} 

\end{document}

Of course the lengths could be different to fit your sizes...

5

Here is a competety different approach using variables instead of the text:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
\begin{align*}
  q^*_1  &=\frac{A}{B-C}  \\
  \text{where}~A &= \text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971} \\
               B &= \text{number of women who had their first birth in 1970} \\
               C &= \text{number of women who had their second birth in 1970} \\
\end{align*}  
\end{document}

enter image description here

For a horizontally centered equation one could use something like the following:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation}
  q^*_1  =\frac{A}{B-C} \nonumber
\end{equation} 
\begin{align*}
  \text{where}~A &= \text{number of women who had their second birth in 1971} \\
               B &= \text{number of women who had their first birth in 1970} \\
               C &= \text{number of women who had their second birth in 1970} \\
\end{align*}
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 2
    I think you should declare the variables outside the align environment... or add this possibility as separate code in case the the equation should be centered or numbered etc. (+1) -for the answers before and after mine- and (-1) -if I could- to the down-voter who didn't even left a comment to a newcomer that at least provided some code – koleygr Mar 15 at 19:36
  • 2
    @koleygr: Thanks for your suggestion. I have added another suggestion on how to achieve a horizontally centered equation. – leandriis Mar 15 at 19:52
5

Just to throw in an alternative layman's view

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}\huge
$q^*_1 =  \text{number of women who had their (} \frac {2^{nd}\text{ birth in 1971}} {1^{st}\text{ birth in 1970}~-~ 2^{nd}\text{ birth in 1970}}$)
\end{document}

  • 2
    Mathematically the abstraction of 1st birth -2nd berth of a woman are minus the years lived before give a birth! (+1 mostly for the imagination part of your solution) – koleygr Mar 15 at 21:45
  • 2
    @koleygr I'm no mathmagician (only a very very poor TeXnician hence the Layman's tag line – user170109 Mar 15 at 21:48
  • 2
    My comment is just humor since means that a woman's second birth is when she is giving a birth (and these is a sentence with the female psychology of my male nature)... I never heard layman's low before... but thanks for noticing (learned something new). Goodnight and happy TeXing! – koleygr Mar 15 at 21:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.