4

I need to write equation as shown in the attached image in LaTex. So far, I have written it like shown below but I can't figure out how to separate (or write properly) the "for" and "and" part of the equation similar to that shown in the image.

\begin{equation}    
P_d(\delta_L)=P_p(\delta_S,L_S)     for \delta_S>\delta_{0S} and \delta_L<\delta_{0L}
\end{equation}

enter image description here I request for help to correct the code. Thank you

1
  • 1
    I tend to use \qquad\text{for $\delta_S>\delta_{0S}$ and $\delta_L<\delta_{0L}$}, this way the math and condition has proper semantic markup
    – daleif
    Commented Mar 25, 2019 at 17:15

4 Answers 4

8

You can use align*.

align

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{align*}    
P_d(\delta_L) &= P_p(\delta_S,L_S)\\
&\phantom{{}={}}\text{for $\delta_S>\delta_{0S}$ and $\delta_L<\delta_{0L}$}
\end{align*}
\end{document}
0
8

Numbered...

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,amssymb}
\begin{document}
\begin{equation}  
\begin{aligned}[b]  
P_d(\delta_L)={}&P_p(\delta_S,L_S)\\
  & \text{for } \delta_S>\delta_{0S} \text{ and } \delta_L<\delta_{0L}
\end{aligned}
\end{equation}
\end{document}

enter image description here

3

Your picture hints you're using a two-column format. Here's my proposal with multlined:

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,mathtools}
\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath}

\usepackage{lipsum} % for context

\begin{document}

\lipsum*[3]
\begin{equation}
\begin{multlined}[b][0.66\displaywidth]
P_d(\delta_L)=P_p(\delta_S,L_S) \\
\text{for $\delta_S>\delta_{0S}$ and $\delta_L<\delta_{0L}$}
\end{multlined}
\end{equation}
\lipsum[4]

\end{document}

The lipsum package is just to provide context. The newtx... packages are to get Times-like fonts as in your picture.

enter image description here

3
  • Hi. How works \begin{multlined}[b][0.66\displaywidth]? It is the first time that I have seen multlined. Thank you very much.
    – Sebastiano
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 11:34
  • 1
    @Sebastiano It's an addition made by mathtools.
    – egreg
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 11:44
  • Ok. I have much appreciated your comment. Ciao.
    – Sebastiano
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 15:29
0
   \begin{document}
    \begin{tabular}{p{1cm}l}    
    $P_d(\delta_L) =$ & $ P_p(\delta_S,L_S)$\\
          &\text{for $\delta_S>\delta_{0S}$ and 
      $\delta_L<\delta_{0L}$}
   \end{tabular}
   \end{document}

How about testing this? Simpler and has more freedom.

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