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I have this equation:

\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
    \alpha &= \frac{1}{100} S \sqrt{2g} = 2.2444e^{-05} \ [m^\frac52/s]\\
    \beta &= \pi r^2 = 0.0079 \ [m^2]\\
    \gamma &= \frac{2 \pi r}{tan(\theta)} = 0.1814 \ [m] \\
    \delta &= \frac{\pi}{(tan(\theta))^2} = 1.0472
\end{split}
\end{equation}

and would like to add a second align point on the second '=' symbol. Is there a way to do that?

Thank

  • 1
    Welcome to TeX.SE! Can you please complete your given code snippet to be compilable? Then we do not have to guess what you are doing and we can see, if you use math related packages like amsmath etc. – Mensch Mar 29 at 2:55
  • Split only supports a single & per line. Use aligned instead, or alignat/alignedat as mentioned below. I tend to always use aligned in situations like this, and will only switch to split when I need the specific features it provides. – daleif Mar 29 at 10:23
  • Sorry, it was my first post, I will write all the code on the next one. – Leonardo Garberoglio Mar 30 at 3:15
2

You can use alignat for this:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

    \begin{alignat*}{2}
        \alpha&=\frac{1}{100} S \sqrt{2g} &&=2.2444e^{-05} \ [m^\frac52/s]\\
        \beta&=\pi r^2&&=0.0079 \ [m^2]\\
        \gamma&=\frac{2 \pi r}{tan(\theta)}&&=0.1814 \ [m]\\
        \delta&=\frac{\pi}{(tan(\theta))^2}&&=1.0472
    \end{alignat*}

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 1
    tan should use a backslash to be typeset upright. – Bernard Mar 29 at 9:52
2

There are multiple questions on the same topic. I am taking the answer of Werner from the question Multiple alignment

Multiple alignment points with no gap between expressions is obtained using the alignat environment from amsmath.

With that, the code changes to:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
    \alpha &= \frac{1}{100} S \sqrt{2g} = 2.2444e^{-05} \ [m^\frac52/s]\\
    \beta &= \pi r^2 = 0.0079 \ [m^2]\\
    \gamma &= \frac{2 \pi r}{tan(\theta)} = 0.1814 \ [m] \\
    \delta &= \frac{\pi}{(tan(\theta))^2} = 1.0472
\end{split}
\end{equation}


\begin{alignat}{2}
    \alpha &= \frac{1}{100} S \sqrt{2g} &&= 2.2444e^{-05} \ [m^\frac52/s] \notag\\
    \beta &= \pi r^2 &&= 0.0079 \ [m^2]\\
    \gamma &= \frac{2 \pi r}{tan(\theta)} &&= 0.1814 \ [m] \notag\\
    \delta &= \frac{\pi}{(tan(\theta))^2} &&= 1.0472 \notag
\end{alignat}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

  • Why to use {3} in \begin{alignat}{3}? I reckon {2} alignments should be also fine. – Majid Abdolshah Mar 29 at 3:50
  • @MajidAbdolshah - Yes you are right. I have updated the answer. – subham soni Mar 29 at 4:17

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