5

I want to use both french quotes and german quotes in my text. French quotes will be for "actual quoting", while the german quotes will be used for accentuation or irony.

Minimal example:

\documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article}%Schriftgröße
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} 
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}%Veröffentlichungssprache

\begin{document}

Das Buch mit dem Titel \flqq uninteressanter Titel\frqq{} hat einen \glqq interessanten Titel\grqq.

The book with the title \flqq uninteresting title\frqq{} has an \glqq interesting title\grqq.

\end{document}

Result:

Das Buch mit dem Titel «uninteressanter Titel» hat einen „interessanten
Titel“.
The book with the title «uninteresting title» has an „interesting title“.

However in german french quotes are used reversed, so it should be

Das Buch mit dem Titel »uninteressanter Titel« hat einen „interessanten
Titel“.
The book with the title »uninteresting title« has an „interesting title“.

Is there a (beginner friendly) way to automatically create "german style french quotes"? Maybe depending on the language setting for babel? Or should I just switch positions of \flqq and \frqq?

I found this page online, which seems to suggest that it is possible.

From the site:

« Frankreich »  \og Frankreich\fg
«Schweiz»   \frqq Schweiz\flqq
»Deutschland«   \flqq Deutschland\frqq
»Österreich«    \flqq {\"O}sterreich\frqq
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  • 4
    Use the csquotes package. Mar 30 '19 at 7:49
  • 1
    FWIW I think that the linked webpage simply confuses \flqq and \frqq in the code examples. It explains the difference in French and German practice and event hints at the problem in "Die Befehle \flqq und \frqq stehen entsprechend für french left / right double quote und \flq und \frq für french left / right quote. Dies ist nicht ganz zutreffend." which I take to imply that the author is aware that for German guillemets left and right are inverted.
    – moewe
    Mar 30 '19 at 12:04
6

As far as I can see \flqq and \frqq are defined in babel.def as

\ProvideTextCommandDefault{\flqq}{%
  \textormath{\guillemotleft}{\mbox{\guillemotleft}}}
\ProvideTextCommandDefault{\frqq}{%
  \textormath{\guillemotright}{\mbox{\guillemotright}}}

At least the German and French babel modules do not change those definitions and it would be extremely confusing if they did. But they add their own shorthands or short macro names for those commands.

That means that to get

»uninteressanter Titel«

you would normally have to type

\frqq uninteressanter Titel\flqq{}

Of course it would be possible to reverse the definitions of \flqq and \frqq, but I would advise against that. Instead I suggest you define semantically meaningful macros for your two quote styles and use those.

For example

\documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} 
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}

\newcommand*{\actualquote}[1]{\frqq #1\flqq{}}
\newcommand*{\scarequote}[1]{\glqq #1\grqq{}}

\begin{document}
Das Buch mit dem Titel \actualquote{uninteressanter Titel} hat
einen \scarequote{interessanten Titel}.

The book with the title \actualquote{uninteresting title} has
an \scarequote{interesting title}.
\end{document}

Das Buch mit dem Titel »uninteressanter Titel« hat einen „interessanten Titel“.//The book with the title »uninteresting title« has an „interesting title“.


Ulrike Fischer suggested csquotes in the comments and that is an extremely good idea. The main idea of csquotes is to provide a universal quotation command, whose output changes according to the surrounding language settings. As far as I can see, csquotes usually assumes that you use one citation style per language and does not support two different styles with two different commands out of the box.

You could try something like

\documentclass[a4paper,11pt]{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} 
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[english,ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage[autostyle,german=guillemets]{csquotes}

\newcommand*{\actualquote}{\enquote}
\newcommand*{\scarequote}[1]{%
  \setquotestyle{german/quotes}%
  \enquote{#1}%
  \setquotestyle*}

\begin{document}
Das Buch mit dem Titel \actualquote{uninteressanter Titel} hat
einen \scarequote{interessanten Titel}.

\selectlanguage{english}
The book with the title \actualquote{uninteresting title} has
an \scarequote{interesting title}.
\end{document}

That gives you language-dependent quotation marks for \actualquote/\enquote and fixed quotation marks for \scarequote. The quotation style for German marks is set to give guillemets of the form »uninteressanter Titel« (»Möwchen«, wie Wikipedia erwähnt).

Das Buch mit dem Titel »uninteressanter Titel« hat einen „interessanten Titel“.//The book with the title “uninteresting title” has an „interesting title“.

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