2

If I use standard \section and \subsection commands I get the following normal behavior:

enter image description here

However, if I renew the section

% Custom sectioning style
\let\oldsection\section
\renewcommand{\section}[1]{
    \begin{center}
        \oldsection*{#1}
    \end{center}
}

\let\oldsubsection\subsection
\renewcommand{\subsection}{\oldsubsection*}

I get the following result

enter image description here

where the section headers appear to be ok, but the subsection header has lost the space above it that makes the separation between the header and the previous text. How can I avoid removing that space?.

Here is the complete code:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry}
\usepackage{titling}

% Packages for maths
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{physics}

% Change padding of boxes
\setlength{\fboxsep}{10pt}

% Custom title
\pretitle{
    \begin{center}
        \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
    \end{center}
    \begin{center}
        \LARGE
}
\title{
    \textbf{Notas en Computación Cuántica}
}
\posttitle{
    \end{center}
    \begin{center}
        \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
    \end{center}
}
\author{\large Jaime Señor}
\date{}

% Custom sectioning style
\let\oldsection\section
\renewcommand{\section}[1]{
    \begin{center}
        \oldsection*{#1}
    \end{center}
}

\let\oldsubsection\subsection
\renewcommand{\subsection}{\oldsubsection*}

\begin{document}

\maketitle

\section{Sobre el operador $\boldsymbol{U_f : \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \rangle \mapsto \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \oplus f(x) \rangle}$}

\subsection{Aplicación sobre una superposición de estados $\boldsymbol{\ket{-}}$ en el qubit objetivo}

Tiene mucha relevancia la aplicación de este tipo de operadores sobre un registro de la forma $(\ket{x} \otimes \ket{-})$:

\begin{equation*}
    U_f(\ket{x}\ket{-}) = U_f \left( \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}} \right) = \dfrac{U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{0} \right) - U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{1} \right)}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}}
\end{equation*}

\begin{equation*}
    \begin{cases}
        f(x) = 0 \quad\Rightarrow\quad \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}} \\[15pt]
        f(x) = 1 \quad\Rightarrow\quad \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{1} - \ket{0}}{\sqrt{2}} = - \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}}
    \end{cases}
\end{equation*}

\begin{equation*}
\boxed{
    U_f(\ket{x} \ket{-}) = (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}\ket{-}
}
\end{equation*}

Lo bueno de usar el estado $\ket{-}$ es que el resultado de $f(x)$ queda codificado en el desplazamiento de fase $(-1)^{f(x)}$. Sin embargo, con el estado $\ket{+}$ no obtenemos ninguna utilidad de cara a implementar un algoritmo, porque $U_f(\ket{x}\ket{+})=\ket{x}\ket{+}$, y no aporta ninguna información sobre $f(x)$.

Otra cosa a tener en cuenta es que según el resultado anterior, $\ket{-}$ es un autoestado de $U_f$ y se queda igual al pasar por el operador, por lo tanto podemos pasar de él al diseñar el algoritmo. A esto se le llama \textit{phase kickback}, y simplifica los algoritmos definiendo $U_f$ como

\begin{equation*}
    U_f: \ket{x} \mapsto (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}
\end{equation*}

\section{El algoritmo de Deutch}

Este algoritmo es uno de los primeros que se aprenden en computación cuántica y mola porque muestra por primera vez la gracia de la superposición cuántica.

\subsection{Enunciado del problema}

dfhgidufs

\end{document}
  • Welcome to TeX SX! Could you please post a complete code, not just a snippet? – Bernard Apr 17 at 14:13
  • There it goes @Bernard :) – Jaime_mc2 Apr 17 at 14:16
  • Actually, the old \subsection doesn't add a line either. Since you aren't generating a table of centers, you might be better off creating a custom \section and \subsection from scratch. – John Kormylo Apr 17 at 14:57
1

Using \titleformat*, from titlesec, it works as you wish, I think:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry}
\usepackage{titling}

% Packages for maths
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{physics}

% Change padding of boxes
\setlength{\fboxsep}{10pt}

% Custom title
\pretitle{
    \begin{center}
        \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
    \end{center}
    \begin{center}
        \LARGE
}
\title{
    \textbf{Notas en Computación Cuántica}
}
\posttitle{
    \end{center}
    \begin{center}
        \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
    \end{center}
}
\author{\large Jaime Señor}
\date{}

% Custom sectioning style
\usepackage{titlesec}
\titleformat*{\section}{\filcenter\Large\bfseries}

\let\oldsection\section
\renewcommand{\section}{\oldsection*}
\let\oldsubsection\subsection
\renewcommand{\subsection}{\oldsubsection*}

\begin{document}

\maketitle

\section{Sobre el operador $\boldsymbol{U_f : \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \rangle \mapsto \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \oplus f(x) \rangle}$}

\subsection{Aplicación sobre una superposición de estados $\boldsymbol{\ket{-}}$ en el qubit objetivo}

Tiene mucha relevancia la aplicación de este tipo de operadores sobre un registro de la forma $(\ket{x} \otimes \ket{-})$:

\begin{equation*}
    U_f(\ket{x}\ket{-}) = U_f \left( \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}} \right) = \dfrac{U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{0} \right) - U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{1} \right)}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}}
\end{equation*}

\begin{equation*}
    \begin{cases}
        f(x) = 0 \quad\Rightarrow\quad \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}} \\[15pt]
        f(x) = 1 \quad\Rightarrow\quad \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{1} - \ket{0}}{\sqrt{2}} = - \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}}
    \end{cases}
\end{equation*}

\begin{equation*}
\boxed{
    U_f(\ket{x} \ket{-}) = (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}\ket{-}
}
\end{equation*}

Lo bueno de usar el estado $\ket{-}$ es que el resultado de $f(x)$ queda codificado en el desplazamiento de fase $(-1)^{f(x)}$. Sin embargo, con el estado $\ket{+}$ no obtenemos ninguna utilidad de cara a implementar un algoritmo, porque $U_f(\ket{x}\ket{+})=\ket{x}\ket{+}$, y no aporta ninguna información sobre $f(x)$.

Otra cosa a tener en cuenta es que según el resultado anterior, $\ket{-}$ es un autoestado de $U_f$ y se queda igual al pasar por el operador, por lo tanto podemos pasar de él al diseñar el algoritmo. A esto se le llama \textit{phase kickback}, y simplifica los algoritmos definiendo $U_f$ como

\begin{equation*}
    U_f: \ket{x} \mapsto (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}
\end{equation*}

\section{El algoritmo de Deutch}

Este algoritmo es uno de los primeros que se aprenden en computación cuántica y mola porque muestra por primera vez la gracia de la superposición cuántica.

\subsection{Enunciado del problema}

dfhgidufs

\end{document} 

enter image description here

  • Yeah, that's what I wanted to do. However, I don't know why but it is not working for me. The subsection is working properly, but the section header appears like normal text. – Jaime_mc2 Apr 17 at 15:21
  • With this very code, and nothing more? – Bernard Apr 17 at 15:22
  • Ok sorry, now it is working properly. I don't know how I commented some lines when copying your solution. Thanks! – Jaime_mc2 Apr 17 at 15:24
0

Rather than redefining \section and \subsection, you can use secnumdepth.

In order to easily center section titles, you can use sectsty.

Don't abuse \boldsymbol. It's better to use \boldmath.

Also, consecutive display environments should be avoided, here I use gather*. No blank line should precede a math display.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry}
\usepackage{titling}

% Packages for maths
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{physics}

\usepackage{sectsty}

% Change padding of boxes
\setlength{\fboxsep}{10pt}

% Custom title
\pretitle{%
  \begin{center}
  \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
  \end{center}
  \begin{center}
  \LARGE
}
\title{%
    \textbf{Notas en Computación Cuántica}%
}
\posttitle{%
    \end{center}
    \begin{center}
        \rule{\textwidth}{2pt}
    \end{center}
}
\author{\large Jaime Señor}
\date{}

% Custom sectioning style
\allsectionsfont{\boldmath}
\sectionfont{\centering\boldmath}
\setcounter{secnumdepth}{-1} % no numbering


\begin{document}

\maketitle

\section{Sobre el operador 
  $U_f : \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \rangle 
    \mapsto \lvert x \rangle \lvert b \oplus f(x) \rangle$}

\subsection{Aplicación sobre una superposición de estados 
  $\ket{-}$ en el qubit objetivo}

Tiene mucha relevancia la aplicación de este tipo de operadores sobre 
un registro de la forma $(\ket{x} \otimes \ket{-})$:
\begin{gather*}
  U_f(\ket{x}\ket{-}) = U_f \left( \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - 
  \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}} \right) = \dfrac{U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{0} \right) - 
  U_f \left( \ket{x}\ket{1} \right)}{\sqrt{2}} = \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - 
  \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}}
\\
  \begin{cases}
    f(x) = 0 \quad\Rightarrow\quad
      \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} =
      \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}}
    \\[15pt]
    f(x) = 1 \quad\Rightarrow\quad
      \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{f(x)} - \ket{1 \oplus f(x)}}{\sqrt{2}} =
      \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{1} - \ket{0}}{\sqrt{2}} =
      - \ket{x} \dfrac{\ket{0} - \ket{1}}{\sqrt{2}}
    \end{cases}
\\
\boxed{
    U_f(\ket{x} \ket{-}) = (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}\ket{-}
}
\end{gather*}

Lo bueno de usar el estado $\ket{-}$ es que el resultado de $f(x)$ 
queda codificado en el desplazamiento de fase $(-1)^{f(x)}$. 
Sin embargo, con el estado $\ket{+}$ no obtenemos ninguna utilidad 
de cara a implementar un algoritmo, porque $U_f(\ket{x}\ket{+})=\ket{x}\ket{+}$, 
y no aporta ninguna información sobre $f(x)$.

Otra cosa a tener en cuenta es que según el resultado anterior, $\ket{-}$ 
es un autoestado de $U_f$ y se queda igual al pasar por el operador, por 
lo tanto podemos pasar de él al diseñar el algoritmo. A esto se le llama 
\textit{phase kickback}, y simplifica los algoritmos definiendo $U_f$ como
\begin{equation*}
    U_f: \ket{x} \mapsto (-1)^{f(x)} \ket{x}
\end{equation*}

\section{El algoritmo de Deutch}

Este algoritmo es uno de los primeros que se aprenden en computación 
cuántica y mola porque muestra por primera vez la gracia de la 
superposición cuántica.

\subsection{Enunciado del problema}

dfhgidufs

\end{document}

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.