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I am trying to draw "distributive arrows" in xypic, but I can't make it look nice. Here is a MWE:

\xymatrix{a\ar @/^1.4pc/[r]  \ar @/^1.4pc/[rrr]  &( b &+& c)}

Does anyone know how to do this well?

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  • Hi Andrew, Welcome to TeX.SE! I indented your code using {}, and removed the thanks- it seems strange, but it helps to keep the site more 'Question & Answer' oriented. Could you turn your snippet into a complete MWE? It really helps folks who want to help.
    – cmhughes
    Commented Mar 21, 2012 at 16:33
  • Using another package instead of xy would be an option for you? Commented Mar 21, 2012 at 17:53
  • I would be open to using another package, if I could get it to work well.
    – Andrew
    Commented Mar 21, 2012 at 21:33
  • What do you mean by "well"? Matsaya has already provided an answer; is it something like that what you want or do you want anything different? Commented Mar 22, 2012 at 2:49

1 Answer 1

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Here is a little modification of your code :

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[all]{xy}
\begin{document}
\xymatrix@C=0.5cm{a\ar @/^1pc/[rr]  \ar @/^2pc/[rrrr]  &&( b &+& c)}
\end{document}

I put one extra column between a and b, change the curving of the first arrow and the size of the column entries (with @C=0.5cm).

But I prefer another way to place the +: use an empty arrow, like that

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[all]{xy}
\begin{document}
\xymatrix{a\ar @/^1pc/[r]  \ar @/^2pc/[rr]  &( b\ar@{}[r]|{+} & c)}
\end{document}

The results is more or less the same, but the code is less cumbersome.

And the results :

enter image description here

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  • Thank you. That looks a lot better than what I originally had.
    – Andrew
    Commented Mar 21, 2012 at 23:02

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