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I'm looking for a code to create those two tables, could someone help me? enter image description here

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    Welcome to TeX.SX! Please sohw what you have tried so far as your question currently is a do-it-for-me type of question. Reagrding the first table, you can start with \begin{tabular}{cccc} or \begin{array}{cccc}. Regarding the diagnoally split cell in the second table, you might want to have a look at: Diagonal lines in table cell
    – leandriis
    May 4, 2019 at 9:07

1 Answer 1

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For this I'd use array I think (it is maths after all and not a table containing text). Additionally I'd use siunitx and its S type columns to align the numbers at the decimal separators. But I'd not use this diagonally separated first cell myself. I'd also not use vertical rules, and the horizontal ones provided by booktabs:

\documentclass[border=3.14]{standalone}

\usepackage{siunitx}
\usepackage{booktabs}

\begin{document}
$\begin{array}{cSSS}
  \toprule
              & {\omega_1} & {\omega_2} & {\omega_3} \\
  \midrule
  X(\omega_i) & 1.05       & 2.34       & 0.95 \\
  Y(\omega_i) & 2.94       & 1.03       & 3.45 \\
  Z(\omega_i) & 10.26      & -1.05      & 1.04 \\
  \bottomrule
\end{array}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

EDIT: Though I don't think the following is good looking, I put it here to show the OP how to typeset his first table.

\documentclass[border=3.14]{standalone}

\usepackage{siunitx}

\begin{document}
$\begin{array}{c|SSS}
  \omega_i    & {\omega_1} & {\omega_2} & {\omega_3} \\
  \hline
  X(\omega_i) & 1.05       & 2.34       & 0.95 \\
  Y(\omega_i) & 2.94       & 1.03       & 3.45 \\
  Z(\omega_i) & 10.26      & -1.05      & 1.04 \\
\end{array}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • Upvote you. Please can you add the cross and the diagonal tabular? Thank you very much.
    – Sebastiano
    May 4, 2019 at 9:16
  • @Sebastiano leandris posted a link in his comment to the question regarding the diagonal line. I will not provide it here, as that would just be a duplicate of the answers there. I just posted what I'd prefer from a typographical point of view. The cross thing isn't pretty, vertical rules in tables in general aren't and should be used really really seldom. I will not provide it. But it isn't hard to produce use c|SSS instead for the array's preamble and \hline instead of \midrule, drop \toprule and \bottomrule, and you got what you want.
    – Skillmon
    May 4, 2019 at 9:21
  • @Sebastiano if you want to you can create your own answer for the simple table with just the vertical and horizontal rule. But as I said, the diagonal line would be a duplicate, and I'd refrain from posting it here.
    – Skillmon
    May 4, 2019 at 9:23
  • No, no I don't remember all the questions about TeX. Forget it. I just wanted to make myself useful to help the user. Thank you very much the same.
    – Sebastiano
    May 4, 2019 at 9:24
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    @Joshua.M as I said in the comments above, this answer is about what I'd use and about typographically good looking tables. For the diagonal cell separation there is the link posted by leandris. I'll edit my answer to include the simple case of just one vertical and one horizontal rule.
    – Skillmon
    May 4, 2019 at 10:17

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