2

I'm trying to denote the letter K that appear in notation Krylov Spaceenter image description here

I've already tried to use \mathcal and \kappa but it's not the same.

4
  • 2
    if you have a pdf of that (eg google suggested sam.math.ethz.ch/~mhg/pub/biksm.pdf) you can list the fonts it uses (just standard computer modern and ams fonts in that case) Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 15:48
  • Welcome to the TeX.SE. What package are you using?
    – Sebastiano
    Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 15:49
  • For my humble opinion the K of your picture is the same of \mathcal{K}.
    – Sebastiano
    Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 16:06
  • 1
    You are probably doing \usepackage{mathptmx}, Look at my edited answer.
    – egreg
    Commented Jun 8, 2019 at 16:27

2 Answers 2

5

It's the standard \mathcal{K}.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\[
\mathcal{K}(r_0;k)=\operatorname{span}\{r_0,Ar_0,\dots,A^kr_0\}
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

I guess that your document uses mathptmx. Do like this:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{mathptmx}

\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcal}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n}

\begin{document}

\[
\mathcal{K}(r_0;k)=\operatorname{span}\{r_0,Ar_0,\dots,A^kr_0\}
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

If you're using newtx, the code should be

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath}
\usepackage{fix-cm}

\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcal}{OMS}{cmsy}{m}{n}

\begin{document}

\[
\mathcal{K}(r_0;k)=\operatorname{span}\{r_0,Ar_0,\dots,A^kr_0\}
\]

\end{document}
0
-1

looks a bit like kappa from txfonts, just a bit bigger:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{txfonts}

\begin{document}

\[
\text{\scalebox{1.4}{$\kappa$}}(r_0)
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • Why downvote? This seems to be a valid answer!
    – hola
    Commented Jun 9, 2019 at 15:25

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