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I'm using a .otf font with pdflatex. The default symbol for the greek letter beta is

enter image description here

which I'm not a fan of. Looking through the otf file, I found another beta symbol that I'd like to use as the default one:

enter image description here

I don't know the command that produces the desired beta, otherwise I'd just switch them around with \renewcommand. The unicode code for the beta I want is U+03D0. How can I swap them?

  • you can not be using the otf font directly in pdftex, pdftex fonts have at most 256 characters, you need to go back to the encoding that you specified when making the tfm font and make a font that uses U+03D0 instead of U+03B2 – David Carlisle Jun 14 at 23:59
  • I've used texmital for the encoding of lowercase greek letters, but going through it I don't see any reference to any unicode code, just 16 groups of 8 symbols, and the \beta command is in the second group (labelled 0x8). There are however 128 spots left vacant, currently filled with .notdef's. Could I use one of them to include the symbol I want? If yes, how? – noibe Jun 15 at 0:12
  • so make a copy of that enc file and replace /beta by the name of the symbol in the font, which you should be able to check in a font editor but /uni03D0 might work – David Carlisle Jun 15 at 0:21
  • Yes, it worked. Feel free to make an answer out of these comments so that I can accept it. – noibe Jun 15 at 0:28
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You can not be using the otf font directly in pdftex, pdftex fonts have at most 256 characters. You need to go back to the encoding that you specified when making the tfm font and make a font that uses U+03D0 instead of U+03B2

so make a copy of that enc file and replace /beta by the name of the symbol in the font, which you should be able to check in a font editor but /uni03D0 might work

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