6

Might be an obvious (or impossible) request, but does anyone know if there's an equivalent of the "less than or greater than" symbol but for "succeeds or precedes?" Thanks!

I've tried using detexify (which would just come back with the \lessgtr symbol) and looking through as many of the math symbol pdf guides as I can find. I might just be missing it, but I've tried searching a few different ways. Alternatively, if the symbol doesn't exist, is there an easy (and at least somewhat elegant) way to force a \succ and \prec on top of each other?

12
  • 3
    Have you checked symbols-a4.pdf? \prec (≺) and \succ (≻) are likely the commands you are looking for.
    – andselisk
    Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 15:42
  • 1
    @AlanMunn I couldn't get it to come up on detexify, Not sure if that's because it doesn't exist, it's too similar to the \lessgtr symbol, or I'm bad at drawing (or all three!)
    – AndrewC
    Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 15:50
  • 2
    You can take a look at the final index in the ComprehensiveLaTeX Symbols list. Other than that, if it doesn't exist (as I think), you can easily make one from \succ and \prec with the \stackinset command from stackengine.
    – Bernard
    Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 15:55
  • 1
    @AndrewC Oh, I see what you mean: an alternative of ≶ for "succeeds or precedes". I don't think I've ever encountered such symbol, interesting question! As for the symbols in comments, I simply used Unicode.
    – andselisk
    Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 15:55
  • 2
    To the best of my knowledge, this doesn't (yet) exist in Unicode. If you can provide a reference to a published instance of the symbol, in context, it can be submitted for consideration. Commented Jul 13, 2019 at 1:46

3 Answers 3

11

With just primitive commands:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,amssymb}

\makeatletter
\newcommand{\succprec}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\succ@prec{\succ\prec}}}
\newcommand{\precsucc}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\succ@prec{\prec\succ}}}

\newcommand{\succ@prec}[2]{\succ@@prec#1#2}
\newcommand{\succ@@prec}[3]{%
  \vcenter{\m@th\offinterlineskip
    \sbox\z@{$#1#3$}%
    \hbox{$#1#2$}\kern-0.4\ht\z@\box\z@
  }%
}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

$A\succprec B\precsucc C_{\succprec\precsucc}$

$\succ\succprec>\gtrless$

\end{document}

enter image description here

Addition for unicode-math

When unicode-math is used, it's not possible to negate the symbols by just prepending \not.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{unicode-math}

\makeatletter
\NewDocumentCommand{\succprec}{}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\succ@prec{\succ\prec}}}
\NewDocumentCommand{\precsucc}{}{\mathrel{\mathpalette\succ@prec{\prec\succ}}}
\NewDocumentCommand{\nsuccprec}{}{\mathrel{\notaccent{\succprec}}}
\NewDocumentCommand{\nprecsucc}{}{\mathrel{\notaccent{\precsucc}}}

\newcommand{\succ@prec}[2]{\succ@@prec#1#2}
\newcommand{\succ@@prec}[3]{%
  \vcenter{\m@th\offinterlineskip
    \sbox\z@{$#1#3$}%
    \hbox{$#1#2$}\kern-0.4\ht\z@\box\z@
  }%
}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

$A\succprec B\precsucc C_{\succprec\precsucc}$

$\succ\succprec>\gtrless$

$\not\succprec\not\precsucc_{\not\succprec}$

\end{document}

enter image description here

One can also use \nprecsucc or \nsuccprec directly.

4
  • Do you have any suggestions about how to negate this symbol? If I use \not\succprec in lualatex the process hangs and I have to terminate it (works find in pdflatex).. Commented Mar 29 at 2:37
  • 1
    @PeterGerdes With unicode-math it's a bit difficult to get negations… Added.
    – egreg
    Commented Mar 29 at 11:13
  • Thanks so much! Out of curiosity, is \notaccent just the symbol that \not is supposed to add so it's just skipping the usual checks with \not? In other words, is this likely to work if I run into issues with negating constructed symbols in unicode-math generally? Commented Apr 8 at 7:29
  • 1
    @PeterGerdes \not is defined in unicode-math to look for the next token, say \foo; if either \nfoo or \notfoo is defined, then it is used, otherwise \notaccent\foo is done. Basically, but not so easily.
    – egreg
    Commented Apr 8 at 8:27
8

Something like this?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb}
\usepackage{stackengine}
\newcommand{\succprec}{\mathrel{\vcenter{\hbox{$\stackMath\stackinset{l}{-0.28em}{c}{0.9ex}{\prec}{\succ}$}}}}

\begin{document}

\[ a\succprec b\]%

\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • The most unfair thing is that I have but one "accept answer." If it's ok, I'm going with @egreg's since the stackengine package seems to be giving my editor fits. But thank you so much for the help!!
    – AndrewC
    Commented Jul 12, 2019 at 16:44
-1

You asked...

How do you create a "succeeds or precedes" symbol?

There is usually no reason to write anything like, x y.

If (xy) and (xy), then x = y.

That is, if (x proceeds or is equal to y) and (y proceeds or is equal to x), then we can simply write that x and y are equal.

Usually, for any two objects x and y, we have xy or xy.

The statement, [(xy) or (xy)] is always true.

For example, we have that (1 is less than 10) or (10 is less than 1).

However, some symbols related to what you asked about are shown below:

≰     ≱     ≲     ≳ 
≴     ≵     ≶     ≷ 
≸     ≹     ≺     ≻ 
≼     ≽     ≾     ≿
⊀     ⊁     ⊰     ⊱
⋚     ⋛     ⋜     ⋝ 
⋞     ⋟     ⋠     ⋡
INPUT OUTPUT
\prec
\preceq
\succ
\succeq
\nsucc
2
  • 1
    This is surely well meant but... how does this answer the question?
    – campa
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 21:27
  • 1
    (xy) and (xy) can both be false. Just think of the order given by "set E is included in set F" for example. The symbol requested in the OP therefore indicates that two elements are comparable.
    – projetmbc
    Commented Nov 8, 2023 at 21:35

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