1

Reading Walter Schmidt's guide .pdf of 2008/1/23 related to Math Time Professional II fonts with LaTeX, alias mtpro2, I have viewed the site of the very good user and young colleague Tobi to which I give my heartfelt congratulations for your skill that he have acquired after that I have visited your profile.

I liked the fonts used especially the k indicated in the following link: https://tobiw.de/en/gallery#oscillations-and-waves&gid=3&pid=6

enter image description here

where I have made a small screenshot. It seems that the character is written with a fountain pen. Excellent. I had a old file .tex with another similar k:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}

% Taking k from fouriernc font
\DeclareFontEncoding{FML}{}{}
\DeclareFontSubstitution{FML}{fncmi}{m}{it}
\DeclareSymbolFont{fourierletters}{FML}{fncmi}{m}{it}
\SetSymbolFont{fourierletters}{bold}{FML}{fncmi}{b}{it}
%
\DeclareMathSymbol{k}{\mathalpha}{fourierletters}{`k}
\makeatletter
\DeclareMathSymbol{\mst@k}{\mathalpha}{fourierletters}{`k}
\makeatother

\begin{document}
$k$
\end{document}

with output:

enter image description here

Is there a way to have a similar k that fits better itself with Times New Roman (newtxtext) but does not compromise my long code structure?

Thank you very much to all for your collaboration.

ADDENDUM: In the opinion of the experts at the graphics site, https://graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/127153/technical-name-of-a-particular-fountain-pen-font the font could be Adobe® Garamond Pro Italic:

enter image description here

At this point is it possible to modify my MWE (with the same technique) to have a similar k, with a free LaTeX font that compiles with pdflatex?

1 Answer 1

2

You could take the k from EBGaramond (or its math companion to be precise). Minimal document showing that only $k$ is affected so you should be able to combine this with whatever other font-setup you have:

\documentclass{article}

\DeclareSymbolFont{ebgletters}{OML}{EBGaramond-Maths}{m}{it}
\DeclareMathSymbol{k}{\mathalpha}{ebgletters}{`k}

\begin{document}
k\textit{k} $k = x + 1$
\end{document}

Result:

enter image description here

1
  • Great and wonderful !!!!!!!!!!!! When I write on the blackboard I often use the English k. But I'm also getting used to the Italian k :-) "Grazie di cuoreeeeee".
    – Sebastiano
    Jul 30, 2019 at 14:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .