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I am using the acronym package. It happens often in my texts that I have something like:

1. We first use a \ac{NA} \citep{exocom2019} and then the text continues.

2. We learn a \ac{VL} (i.e., something we did not know before).

What will look like the following in a text.

  1. We first use a New Acronym (NA) (Exocom, 2019) and then the text continues.

  2. We learn a Valuable Lesson (VL) (i.e., something we did not know before).

Is there a way in the acronym package, so that I can merge the parentheses? In a way the output becomes something like:

  1. We first use a New Acronym (NA; Exocom, 2019) and then the text continues.

  2. We learn a Valuable Lesson (VL; i.e., something we did not know before).

In case somebody has another good solution or workaround to the problem, please let me know.

PS: I tried to update the examples and add code as asked. I hope that helps.

PPS: An MWE

--- mwe.tex ---

\documentclass[12pt]{book}

\usepackage[printonlyused]{acronym} % used for the nice acronyms
\usepackage[style=authoryear-comp,citestyle=authoryear,natbib=true,backend=bibtex,maxbibnames=99,maxcitenames=1]{biblatex} %NEW BIB: needed so that bibentry works

\bibliography{mweBib}

\begin{document}

\begin{acronym}
    \acro{NA}{New Acronym} 
    \acro{VL}{Valuable Lesson} 
\end{acronym}

1. We first use a \ac{NA} \citep{exocom2019} and then the text continues.

2. We learn a \ac{VL} (i.e., something we did not know before).
\end{document}

--- mweBib.bib ---

@inproceedings{exocom2019,
  title={My title},
  author={Exocom},
  year={2019},
  booktitle = {Proc. Stackexchange}
}

--- command ---

latexmk -pvc mwe.tex
  • 1
    It is quite hard to follow what you are asking. To be able to reproduce the issue, please post a compilable code sample. – Hans Lollo Aug 14 at 7:44
  • 1
    I don't know how to do it with citations, but with normal parenthesis you could solve the problem by hand with explicit commands: \acl{NA} (\acs{NA}; ....) – Ignasi Aug 14 at 8:40
  • I can imho not use the \acl{} and \acs combination, as this leads to the acronym being written out fully twice. Once where I do it by hand and once by the package that thinks the next time it encounters an \ac{} it has not been introduced yet. – Exocom Aug 14 at 9:29
  • 1
    I believe this is something acro supports with the cite key/group-citation package option, though I've never used it. See this question/answer for an example. – Dai Bowen Aug 14 at 9:41
  • 1
    @Exocom You could include an \acused command to prevent the acronym being fully printed twice. – Ignasi Aug 14 at 9:46

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