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When using pdflatex to create a beamer presentation and then viewing it in Preview.app (single page or fullscreen mode), page transitions are blurry: when going to the next slide, a blurry/low-resolution version shows for about one second before it becomes sharp. This appears to be the case for all PDFKit-based viewers, e.g. also Skim.

Acrobat Reader does not suffer from this problem. On the other hand, it doesn't support reloading the underlying document when it has changed. So one has to close and reopen the file every time a change is made to the latex document, which is painful.

Is there a Mac OS viewer for pdflatex/beamer presentations that doesn't do blurry transitions, but supports reloading?

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  • Welcome to TeX.SE! That is the standard behaviour on MAC Os. There is a duplicate question for that, but at the momaent I was not able to found it ...
    – Mensch
    Aug 17, 2019 at 7:04
  • @Mensch Question regarding viewers to be used for LaTeX documents have not been treated as off topic. However, if it is a duplicate, I agree to close, but then we have to find that duplicate.
    – Sveinung
    Aug 17, 2019 at 8:15
  • Please note that my question is very specific: Is there a viewer on Mac OS with two features: (1) non-blurry transitions and (2) reloading? I doubt there is a duplicate of this particular question.
    – Maxim
    Aug 17, 2019 at 8:19
  • Since this is not really related to LaTeX but a general feature of MacOS, it's off-topic here. Maybe you will find help at Super User.
    – schtandard
    Aug 17, 2019 at 8:53
  • @Mensch I was meant as an comment to your comment. Here is the duplicates: Internal pdf viewer in texmaker pixelated on Mac Sierra and the deleted answer Internal Pdf viewer in Texmaker blurry on Mac Sierra. None of them has an answer.
    – Sveinung
    Aug 17, 2019 at 8:57

2 Answers 2

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I use Firefox to show PDFs created from Beamer documents in presentation mode.

With Firefox

Here is how my workflow looks with Firefox:

  • Enter this command to launch the presentation:

    open -a Firefox slides.pdf
    
  • Press control + alt + p to switch to presentation mode. Alternatively, click the "Switch to Presentation Mode" button (the square button with four arrows pointing outwards) to switch to presentation mode. The slides are now displayed in full screen mode. If the aspect ratio of the slides do not match that of the display, then the slides are pillarboxed with black bars on either side.

  • Since it does not automatically reload the presentation, press command + r or click the reload button in the toolbar to reload the presentation.

See Keyboard Shorcuts: PDF Viewer for the relevant keyboard shortcuts.

To remove the "pdf.js is now full screen" and "Exit Full Screen (esc)" warning that appears for 3 seconds immediately after switching to full screen, perform the following steps:

  • Type about:config in the address bar and hit enter.
  • Click "I accept the risk!".
  • Search for full-screen.
  • Double-click on full-screen-api.warning.timeout.
  • Replace the default value with 0.
  • Click "OK".

With Chrome

Here is how the same workflow would look like on Chrome:

  • Enter this command to launch the presentation:

    open -a "Google Chrome" slides.pdf
    
  • Hover the mouse pointer on the bottom right section of the page (i.e., the bottom right section of the PDF viewer's background, not just the bottom right section of the PDF content), and click the "Fit to page" button.

  • Press control + command + f to enter full screen mode. Alternatively, from the menu, select View > Enter Full Screen. The slides are now displayed in full screen mode. If the aspect ratio of the slides do not match that of the display, then the slides are pillarboxed with gray bars on either side.

  • Press command + r or click the reload button in the toolbar to reload the presentation.

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On CTAN, there is a somewhat dated script, AcroReloadPDF, available that was originally written for pre-9 versions of Acrobat Reader for Linux, in order to add a "Reload" entry to the File menue.

Under Unix-like systems, it goes into the

~/.adobe/Acrobat/<version number>/JavaScripts/

directory.

Though not tested beyond Linux, it may turn out to be usable on OSX as well. The only requirement is that AR must not lock the PDF file when opened (which it does under Windows) to be useful.

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