4

What is the math font of unicode-math that can get the following output:

enter image description here

since the following:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\begin{document}
$\symbb{R}$
\end{document}

results in

enter image description here

  • duplicate of this, I think tex.stackexchange.com/questions/60014/… – David Carlisle Sep 9 at 21:51
  • @DavidCarlisle The fonts there have results close to what I need but not identical. I would be happier if I could know how to get exactly the same style :) – Diaa Sep 9 at 22:08
  • 3
    The style you are looking for is provided by amsfonts, accessed by \mathbb{R}. – barbara beeton Sep 10 at 1:00
  • I guess the closest match could be from mtpro2 but it is to be compiled with pdflatex. \documentclass[border=1mm]{standalone} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[lite,amsbb]{mtpro2} \begin{document}\Huge $\mathbb{R}$ \end{document} – BambOo Sep 10 at 14:06
  • 1
    Unfortunately, I'm unable to experiment, and haven't tried this before. But this answer (using XeTeX) should provide useful guidance: Unicode-math and \Re – barbara beeton Sep 10 at 16:11
4

Mplus gets close:

Mplus

Note: Barbara is right. amsfonts

\documentclass{article}
%\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\begin{document}
{\Huge $\mathbb{R}$}
\end{document}

So the answer would be: either a truetype/opentype version of amsfonts, or unicode-math can still use legacy fonts, if desired.

unicode-math access is by $\symbb{R}$.

=============

Original post:

I've seen that one before.

A sort of sans libertine/helvetica flavour.

Some random samples, none with a straight leg:

a to l

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\pagecolor{red!3}


\newcommand\SampleText{\symbol{"211D}}


\newfontface\fra{Arial Unicode MS}
\newfontface\frb{Cambria Math}
\newfontface\frc{DejaVu Math}
\newfontface\frd{DejaVu Math TeX Gyre}
\newfontface\fre{DejaVu Sans}
\newfontface\frf{DejaVu Sans Mono}
\newfontface\frg{DejaVu Serif}
\newfontface\frh{Fira Math}
\newfontface\fri{FreeSans}
\newfontface\frj{FreeSerif}
\newfontface\frk{FreeSerifAvvaShenouda}
\newfontface\frl{GFS Neohellenic Math}
\newfontface\frm{Honoka Antique-Kaku}
\newfontface\frn{Honoka Antique-Maru}
\newfontface\fro{HPMLinux Biolinum O}
\newfontface\frp{HPMLinux Libertine O}
\newfontface\frq{Kabala}
\newfontface\frr{Libertinus Math}
\newfontface\frs{Libertinus Mono}
\newfontface\frt{Libertinus Sans}
\newfontface\fru{Libertinus Serif}
\newfontface\frv{Libertinus Serif Display}
\newfontface\frw{Linux Biolinum}
\newfontface\frx{Linux Biolinum G}
\newfontface\fry{Linux Biolinum O}
\newfontface\frz{Lucida Sans Unicode}

\newcommand\printther[2]{{#1\huge    \SampleText} -- #2}


\begin{document}


\printther{\fra}{Arial Unicode MS}

\printther{\frb}{Cambria Math}

\printther{\frc}{DejaVu Math}

\printther{\frd}{DejaVu Math TeX Gyre}

\printther{\fre}{DejaVu Sans}

\printther{\frf}{DejaVu Sans Mono}

\printther{\frg}{DejaVu Serif}

\printther{\frh}{Fira Math}

\printther{\fri}{FreeSans}

\printther{\frj}{FreeSerif}

\printther{\frk}{FreeSerifAvvaShenouda}

\printther{\frl}{GFS Neohellenic Math}

\printther{\frm}{Honoka Antique-Kaku}

\printther{\frn}{Honoka Antique-Maru}

\printther{\fro}{HPMLinux Biolinum O}

\printther{\frp}{HPMLinux Libertine O}

\printther{\frq}{Kabala}

\printther{\frr}{Libertinus Math}

\printther{\frs}{Libertinus Mono}

%\printther{\frt}{Libertinus Sans}
%
%\printther{\fru}{Libertinus Serif}
%
%\printther{\frv}{Libertinus Serif Display}
%
%\printther{\frw}{Linux Biolinum}
%
%\printther{\frx}{Linux Biolinum G}
%
%\printther{\fry}{Linux Biolinum O}

\printther{\frz}{Lucida Sans Unicode}

{\fra \SampleText}
{\frb \SampleText}
{\frc \SampleText}
{\frd \SampleText}
{\fre \SampleText}
{\frf \SampleText}
{\frg \SampleText}
{\frh \SampleText}
{\fri \SampleText}
{\frj \SampleText}
{\frk \SampleText}
{\frl \SampleText}
{\frm \SampleText}
{\frn \SampleText}
{\fro \SampleText}
{\frp \SampleText}
{\frq \SampleText}
{\frr \SampleText}
{\frs \SampleText}
{\frt \SampleText}
{\fru \SampleText}
{\frv \SampleText}
{\frw \SampleText}
{\frx \SampleText}
{\fry \SampleText}
{\frz \SampleText}


\end{document}

====

For completeness, a fuller gallery, in parts, more systematically arranged.

(1) These are (some of) the ones with "Math" in the font name:

mathr

And then in order of decreasing coverage of the Letterlike Symbols unicode block:

(2)

r2

(3)

r3

(4)

r4

(5)

r5

(6)

r6

And arbitrarily stop there, with a coverage of 20 out of 80 glyphs in the block.

There is obviously something very interesting going on with fonts.

  • Thanks for the informative answer. – Diaa Sep 10 at 18:36
  • You may add TeX Gyre Pagella Math to your gallery for future readers. – Diaa Sep 10 at 18:44
4

Cambria Math uses a nearly-identical glyph. Ironically, you’d need to pay money for this copyrighted font, even though the reason you want it is that they ripped off someone else’s design. (It’s owned by Microsoft and included with Windows and Office. If you dual-boot Linux, you could make a symbolic link from the font file on your Windows partition to ~/.fonts or /usr/local/share/fonts. You could also buy the font from Monotype.)

You can select math alphabets or individual glyphs from the font of your choice with the range= option of \setmathfont. For example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}

\setmathfont{Latin Modern Math}
\setmathfont{TeX Gyre Pagella Math}[range={bb,bbit}, Scale=MatchUppercase]

\begin{document}
\[ \mathbb{CDHNRQSZ} \]
\end{document}

TeX Gyre Pagella Math Sample

Or with the font changed to:

\setmathfont{TeX Gyre DejaVu Math}[range={bb,bbit}, Scale=MatchUppercase]

TeX Gyre DejaVu Math sample

You can change only the ℝ with

\setmathfont[range=`ℝ]

or

\setmathfont[range=\BbbR]

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