3

I am trying to (a), (b), (c) enumeration but when I add [(a)] next to \begin{enumerate} as \begin{enumerate}[(a)], it is not making enumeration.

Could you please help me about solving this problem?

Thank you in advance.

  \begin{enumerate}
    \item Suppose $m$ = 6 kg, $k$ = 3 kg/sec. How high will the projectile go? When will it return to 
        earth, i.e., to $y$ = 0?
        \item Suppose $m$ = 12 kg, $k$ = 3 kg/sec. How high will the projectile go? When will it return to 
        earth?
        \item When $k$ = 0, i.e., there is no air resistance, the equation governing the motion yield $$
        \bar{v} = -gt + v_0, \bar{y} = -\frac{ g t^2 }{ 2 } + v_0 t
        $$
        where the $\bar{v}$ and $\bar{y}$ are the values of the velocity and position when $k$ = 0. 
        Let $v_0$ = 25 m/sec. and $m$ = 6 kg. Now let successively $k$ = 1, 0.1, 0.001, 0.0001 and calculate 
        the return times and compare them with the return time 
        for $k$ = 0. The numerical evidence should suggest that as $k\rightarrow 0$, the return times converge to the value for $k$ = 0. 
\end{enumerate}
5

To manage listings i suggest you to add \usepackage{enumitem}. At this moment try to use the options:

\begin{enumerate}[label=(\alph*)]
    \item Suppose $m$ = 6 kg, $k$ = 3 kg/sec. How high will the projectile go? When will it return to 
        earth, i.e., to $y$ = 0?
        \item Suppose $m$ = 12 kg, $k$ = 3 kg/sec. How high will the projectile go? When will it return to 
        earth?
        \item When $k$ = 0, i.e., there is no air resistance, the equation governing the motion yield $$
        \bar{v} = -gt + v_0, \bar{y} = -\frac{ g t^2 }{ 2 } + v_0 t
        $$
        where the $\bar{v}$ and $\bar{y}$ are the values of the velocity and position when $k$ = 0. 
        Let $v_0$ = 25 m/sec. and $m$ = 6 kg. Now let successively $k$ = 1, 0.1, 0.001, 0.0001 and calculate 
        the return times and compare them with the return time 
        for $k$ = 0. The numerical evidence should suggest that as $k\rightarrow 0$, the return times converge to the value for $k$ = 0. 
\end{enumerate}

EDIT :

As @Mico suggested, you should surround the numerical values by $ too and switch the $$ into \[...\] or \begin{equation*}...\end{equation*} (see related topic here). I've also added spaces around ; in your motion equations.

\begin{enumerate}[label=(\alph*)]
        \item Suppose $m = 6$\,kg, $k = 3 $\,kg/sec. How high will the projectile go ? When will it return to earth, i.e., to $y = 0$ ?
        \item Suppose $m= 12$\,kg, $k = 3$\,kg/sec. How high will the projectile go ? When will it return to earth ?
        \item When $k = 0$, i.e., there is no air resistance, the equation governing the motion yield 
        \[
            \bar{v} = -gt + v_0\quad ;\quad \bar{y} = -\frac{ g t^2 }{ 2 } + v_0 t
        \]

        where the $\bar{v}$ and $\bar{y}$ are the values of the velocity and position when $k = 0$. 
        Let $v_0 = 25$\,m/sec. and $m = 6$\,kg. Now let successively $k = 1, 0.1, 0.001, 0.0001$ and calculate  the return times and compare them with the return time for $k = 0$. The numerical evidence should suggest that as $k\rightarrow 0$, the return times converge to the value for $k = 0$. 
    \end{enumerate}
  • 1
    You may also want to point out that it's better to write $k = 0$ than $k$ = 0, $k = 1, 0.1, 0.001, 0.0001$ is better than $k$ = 1, 0.1, 0.001, 0.0001, $y = 0$ is better than $y$ = 0, etc. – Mico Oct 12 at 6:01
  • Thank you so much I am truly appreciated to you for your help and support – serife gizem baci Oct 12 at 6:36
  • 1
    @Mico, you're right, i've added your tips and improved the code for more readability. – Piroooh Oct 12 at 8:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.