2

My documents uses memoir with \OnehalfSpacing and I am trying to get the \normalfont \f@baselineskip to set the \footnotesep with \SingleSpacing.

I could just keep the default value of \footnotesep, but after I setup my document font sizes, the default value of \footnotesep is smaller than \f@baselineskip.

How to get the \normalsize or \small font \baselineskip size and set it to the \footnotesep, for example, something like \setlength{\footnotesep}{\smallsize@baselineskip}?

\documentclass[10pt]{memoir}
\usepackage[english]{babel}
\OnehalfSpacing

\makeatletter
\setlength{\footnotesep}{\f@baselineskip}

\newcommand{\showfont}
{%
    (\foreignlanguage{english}
    {%
        encoding: \f@encoding{},
        family: \f@family{},
        series: \f@series{},
        shape: \f@shape{},
        size: \f@size{},
        baseline: \f@baselineskip{},
        linespread: \f@linespread{},
        linespacing: \the\baselineskip{}%
    })%
}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem
Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an
unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen
book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic
typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s
with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more
recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including
versions of Lorem Ipsum \showfont.

Fist\footnote{
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem
Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an
unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen
book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic
typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s
with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more
recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including
versions of Lorem Ipsum \showfont.
}.

Second\footnote{
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem
Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an
unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen
book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic
typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s
with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more
recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including
versions of Lorem Ipsum \showfont.
}.

Third\footnote{
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem
Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an
unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen
book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic
typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s
with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more
recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including
versions of Lorem Ipsum \showfont.
}.

\end{document}

Related questions

  1. How does \footnotesize map to \fontsize{size}{baselineskip}
  2. Source of "correct" baselinestretch values for various fonts?
  3. Specifying percent of font size (as normalsize)
  4. font size selection how multiple of \normalsize
  5. Default baselineskip for corresponding font size
  6. Size of \baselineskip for \\ if font size is \footnotesize?
2

I am not sure that I understand your question but perhaps you are looking for

\small
\setlength{\footnotesep}{\baselineskip}%
\normalsize

which will set \footnotesep to \baselineskip used for \small

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, that is the question. Can I do this my my preamble? – user Nov 2 '19 at 22:06
  • yes of course @user – David Carlisle Nov 2 '19 at 22:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.