1

Following advice I got on this list (thanks!) I switched from natbib APA to natbib authoryear-ibid, which looks quite nice, but there is one major flow, which one of the authors noticed: when you have a citation with two references with the same author, the name of the author is written twice. Here is a minimal example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{filecontents}
\begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib}
@ARTICLE{bib17,
   AUTHOR = {Joyce, Terry},
   TITLE = {{The Significance of the Morphographic Principle for the Classification of Writing Systems}},
   JOURNAL = {Written Language and Literacy},
   YEAR = {2011},
   VOLUME = {14},
   PAGES = {58--81},
}

@PHDTHESIS{bib16,
   AUTHOR = {Joyce, Terry},
   TITLE = {{The Japanese Mental Lexicon: The Lexical Retrieval and Representation of Two-Kanji Compound Words from a Morphological Perspective}},
   SCHOOL = {University of Tsukuba},
   YEAR = {2001},
}
\end{filecontents}
\usepackage[natbib=true,style=authoryear-ibid,backend=biber]{biblatex}
\renewcommand\bibnamedash{\mbox{\rule[.5ex]{15mm}{0.4pt}\space}}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib} 
\begin{document}
According to \citet{bib16,bib17}, we have...
\printbibliography
\end{document}

and the result:

enter image description here

which is suboptimal: I would expect \citet{bib16,bib17} to produce “Joyce (2001; 2011)” instead of “Joyce (2001) and Joyce (2011)” as if these are not the same Joyce. After all if I wanted to have “Joyce (2001) and Joyce (2011)” I would have written \citet{bib16} and \citet{bib17}.

What do I need to change to obtain this behavior?

1 Answer 1

2

If you want to 'compress' citations by the same list of authors/editors, you'll want to look into the comp sub-style family of the standard biblatex styles.

The 'comp' version of authoryear-ibid is authoryear-icomp, so you probably just want

\usepackage[style=authoryear-icomp, backend=biber]{biblatex}

You can find examples of all standard styles in https://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/biblatex/doc/examples. In the documentation of biblatex 3.13 the section dealing with the standard styles (§3.3 Standard Styles, pp. 72-78) has handy links directly to those examples.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[style=authoryear-icomp,backend=biber]{biblatex}
\renewcommand\bibnamedash{\mbox{\rule[.5ex]{15mm}{0.4pt}\space}}

\begin{filecontents}{\jobname.bib}
@ARTICLE{bib17,
  AUTHOR  = {Joyce, Terry},
  TITLE   = {The Significance of the Morphographic Principle
             for the Classification of Writing Systems},
  JOURNAL = {Written Language and Literacy},
  YEAR    = {2011},
  VOLUME  = {14},
  PAGES   = {58--81},
}
@PHDTHESIS{bib16,
  AUTHOR = {Joyce, Terry},
  TITLE  = {The {Japanese} Mental Lexicon:
            The Lexical Retrieval and Representation of
            Two-Kanji Compound Words from a Morphological Perspective},
  SCHOOL = {University of Tsukuba},
  YEAR   = {2001},
}
\end{filecontents}
\addbibresource{\jobname.bib} 
\begin{document}
According to \textcite{bib16,bib17}, we have...
\printbibliography
\end{document}

According to Joyce (2001, 2011), we have...

5
  • And how can I have a semicolon instead of a comma between the two dates?
    – yannis
    Nov 13, 2019 at 21:12
  • OK, I found the answer: it is \renewcommand\compcitedelim{;\space}. Thank you so much!
    – yannis
    Nov 13, 2019 at 21:25
  • 2
    @yannis \renewcommand*{\compcitedelim}{\multicitedelim} (or maybe \renewcommand*{\compcitedelim}{\addsemicolon\space}) would be slightly nicer.
    – moewe
    Nov 13, 2019 at 21:27
  • I have another question: in this style there is no comma between author name and year, which is fine. But when I use this volume instead of a year, I get the author name followed by “this volume” which is weird. Is there a way to obtain a comma whenever the year is “this volume” or “in press”? Or how should I encode these two special cases?
    – yannis
    Nov 13, 2019 at 22:25
  • 1
    @yannis You can get a comma at all times with \DeclareDelimFormat{nameyeardelim}{\addcomma\space}. If you want one only if you have non-date dates, I suggest you ask a new question.
    – moewe
    Nov 14, 2019 at 6:19

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